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Sharlot Hall, John Mahony, John Duke and dog

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l. to r., John Duke, Sharlot Hall and John Mahony and dog standing beside Pauline Weaver commemorative stone at Sharlot Hall Museum.
In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.
John Fitzgibbon Mahony (b. August 14, 1849, d. April 15, 1940) was born in County Cork, Ireland. He imigrated to the U. S. at the age of 17 and after joining General Custer's Seventh Cavalry after the Civil War, was sent to Arizona in 1866. He was primarily engaged in mining, in Arizona, California and Nevada, and he mined in Yavapai County after 1876. He served as city engineer of Prescott for nine years, during which time he was in charge of the City's water system when the first water meters were installed. He later served as superintendent of the Tonto Basin quartz mills and as engineer at the Crystal Ice Plant. Following his retirement, he was elected state commander of the United Indian War Veterans and was national commander in 1934-35.
John F. Duke (b.November 12, 1845, d. January 23,1935) arrived in Arizona in 1869 as a member of General Custer's Seventh Cavalry, having served for three years in the Indian campaigns in Kansas and Nebraska. In 1875 he purchased the City ranch on Granite Creek and was engaged in dairy cattle raising and mining for many years. In later years he became the owner and operator of the St. Michael's Hotel. He was also active in the United Indian War Veterans and was elected national color bearer for life in 1931.
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Details

Old Call Number: po0164pb
New Call Number: 1928-0001-0250
Location: MS-12 - Box 19 - Folder 8
Photo Date: c. 1930s
Medium: B&W
Original Format: Print
Size: 3.5x5
File Name: po0164pb.jpg
Rights: Reproduction requires permission. Digital images property of SHM Library & Archives.
Photo Collection: Sharlot M. Hall

Additional Info

Old Call Number po0164pb
New Call Number 1928-0001-0250
Photo Collection Sharlot M. Hall
Location MS-12 - Box 19 - Folder 8
Creator No
Distributor No
Photo Date c. 1930s
Medium B&W
Original Format Print
Size 3.5x5
File Name po0164pb.jpg
Rights Reproduction requires permission. Digital images property of SHM Library & Archives.
Staff Notes No
Description l. to r., John Duke, Sharlot Hall and John Mahony and dog standing beside Pauline Weaver commemorative stone at Sharlot Hall Museum. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. John Fitzgibbon Mahony (b. August 14, 1849, d. April 15, 1940) was born in County Cork, Ireland. He imigrated to the U. S. at the age of 17 and after joining General Custer's Seventh Cavalry after the Civil War, was sent to Arizona in 1866. He was primarily engaged in mining, in Arizona, California and Nevada, and he mined in Yavapai County after 1876. He served as city engineer of Prescott for nine years, during which time he was in charge of the City's water system when the first water meters were installed. He later served as superintendent of the Tonto Basin quartz mills and as engineer at the Crystal Ice Plant. Following his retirement, he was elected state commander of the United Indian War Veterans and was national commander in 1934-35. John F. Duke (b. November 12, 1845, d. January 23,1935) arrived in Arizona in 1869 as a member of General Custer's Seventh Cavalry, having served for three years in the Indian campaigns in Kansas and Nebraska. In 1875 he purchased the City ranch on Granite Creek and was engaged in dairy cattle raising and mining for many years. In later years he became the owner and operator of the St. Michael's Hotel. He was also active in the United Indian War Veterans and was elected national color bearer for life in 1931.