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Sharlot Hall, Governor & Mrs. LaGuardia and officials

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l. to r. Fjorello LaGuardia, Charles Robb, Mrs. LaGuardia, Sharlot Hall, Grace Sparkes and unidentified man before Governor's Mansion. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.
Fiorella H. La Guardia (b. December 11, 1882; d. September 20, 1947) was born in New York City, the son of Achille Luigi Carlo La Guardia, who was a musician and bandmaster of the 11th U. S. Army Infantry Band. He served in that capacity at Whipple Barracks from 1892 to 1898, during which time his son, Fiorella, attended schools in Prescott. Fiorella later practiced law in New York City, served in the U. S. Army Air Service during World War I, was a member of the U. S. House of Representatives, and served as Mayor of New York City for three consecutive terms from 1934-45. He later served as director general of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration. When he visited Prescott in 1935 and 1938, the City he claimed to be his hometown, he received warm welcomes.Fiorella La GuMaria Fisher La Guardia served asardia's secretary for 12 years during his years in Congress and prior to their marriage. They had two adopted children, Jean and Eric.
Charles F. Robb (b. 1888; d. September 25,1972) was a native of Ames, Iowa and moved to Prescott from Chicago in 1896. After attending Prescott schools, he attended Harvard Military Academy and graduated from Stanford University. He was formerly a divisional superintendent of the W. J. Burns Detective Agency. He served as an Army Intelligence Officer during World War I. He served two terms as Mayor of Prescott, from 1933 to 1937, during which time many bridges and W.P.A. Projects were completed. In later years he was associated with the A. O. Hesla Jewelry Store. One of his Prescott school friends was Fiorella La Guardia, a future Mayor of New York City, and they remained in contact following graduation. Mr. Robb, with the assistance of Mayor La Guardia, is credited with the transformation of the soon-to-be-abandoned Fort Whipple to a Veterans Administration Center.
Grace Marian Sparkes (b. January 21,1893, d. October 22,1963) was born in Lead, South Dakota and moved to Arizona with her family in 1906. She worked for the Prescott Chamber of Commerce from 1911 until 1945, serving as secretary until resigning to oversee her mining interests in Cochise County. During her tenure, she helped organize the Smoki People of Prescott and joined Sharlot Hall in efforts to establish a permanent reservation for the Yavapai Indians near Prescott. Other contributions of Mrs. Sparkes included the management of the Prescott Frontier Days rodeo, the financing of the Hassayampa Hotel, and the securing of the approval of federal projects including the establishment of a Veterans Hospital, the renovation of Tuzigoot Indian Ruins and the restoration of the Governor’s Mansion. She served on the Arizona State Board of Welfare, was coordinator for an Arizona exhibit at the Chicago Century of Progress World’s Fair of 1934, and was volunteer secretary of the Northern Arizona State Fair Association.
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Details

File Name: po0167.2pa.jpg
Location: MS-12, Folder 19, File 8
Medium: B&W
New Call Number: 1928-0001-0259
Old Call Number: po0167.2pa
Original Format: Print
Photo Collection: Sharlot M. Hall
Photo Date: c. Mid 1930's
Rights: Reproduction requires permission. Digital images property of SHM Library & Archives.
Size: 8x10
Staff Notes: Research in process (DDM)

Additional Info

Old Call Number po0167.2pa
New Call Number 1928-0001-0259
Photo Collection Sharlot M. Hall
Location MS-12, Folder 19, File 8
Creator No
Distributor No
Photo Date c. Mid 1930's
Medium B&W
Original Format Print
Size 8x10
File Name po0167.2pa.jpg
Rights Reproduction requires permission. Digital images property of SHM Library & Archives.
Staff Notes Research in process (DDM)
Description l. to r. Fjorello LaGuardia, Charles Robb, Mrs. LaGuardia, Sharlot Hall, Grace Sparkes and unidentified man before Governor's Mansion. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Fiorella H. La Guardia (b. December 11, 1882; d. September 20, 1947) was born in New York City, the son of Achille Luigi Carlo La Guardia, who was a musician and bandmaster of the 11th U. S. Army Infantry Band. He served in that capacity at Whipple Barracks from 1892 to 1898, during which time his son, Fiorella, attended schools in Prescott. Fiorella later practiced law in New York City, served in the U. S. Army Air Service during World War I, was a member of the U. S. House of Representatives, and served as Mayor of New York City for three consecutive terms from 1934-45. He later served as director general of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration. When he visited Prescott in 1935 and 1938, the City he claimed to be his hometown, he received warm welcomes.Fiorella La GuMaria Fisher La Guardia served asardia's secretary for 12 years during his years in Congress and prior to their marriage. They had two adopted children, Jean and Eric. Charles F. Robb (b. 1888; d. September 25,1972) was a native of Ames, Iowa and moved to Prescott from Chicago in 1896. After attending Prescott schools, he attended Harvard Military Academy and graduated from Stanford University. He was formerly a divisional superintendent of the W. J. Burns Detective Agency. He served as an Army Intelligence Officer during World War I. He served two terms as Mayor of Prescott, from 1933 to 1937, during which time many bridges and W.P.A. Projects were completed. In later years he was associated with the A. O. Hesla Jewelry Store. One of his Prescott school friends was Fiorella La Guardia, a future Mayor of New York City, and they remained in contact following graduation. Mr. Robb, with the assistance of Mayor La Guardia, is credited with the transformation of the soon-to-be-abandoned Fort Whipple to a Veterans Administration Center. Grace Marian Sparkes (b. January 21,1893, d. October 22,1963) was born in Lead, South Dakota and moved to Arizona with her family in 1906. She worked for the Prescott Chamber of Commerce from 1911 until 1945, serving as secretary until resigning to oversee her mining interests in Cochise County. During her tenure, she helped organize the Smoki People of Prescott and joined Sharlot Hall in efforts to establish a permanent reservation for the Yavapai Indians near Prescott. Other contributions of Mrs. Sparkes included the management of the Prescott Frontier Days rodeo, the financing of the Hassayampa Hotel, and the securing of the approval of federal projects including the establishment of a Veterans Hospital, the renovation of Tuzigoot Indian Ruins and the restoration of the Governor’s Mansion. She served on the Arizona State Board of Welfare, was coordinator for an Arizona exhibit at the Chicago Century of Progress World’s Fair of 1934, and was volunteer secretary of the Northern Arizona State Fair Association.