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John Townsend

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Details

Creator: Bate Studios
File Name: 1985-0146-0062.jpg
Location: MS Oversize/Drawer 7/Folder 1
Medium: B&W
New Call Number: 1985-0146-0062
Old Call Number: po0648pc
Original Format: Print
Photo Collection: Bate Brothers Studio
Photo Date: Early 1870s
Rights: Reproduction requires permission. Digital images property of SHM Library & Archives.
Size: 10x12
Staff Notes: This is a full head to toe portrait and matches 1985-0146-0001, which is a cropped version of this photo. BST

Additional Info

Old Call Number po0648pc
New Call Number 1985-0146-0062
Photo Collection Bate Brothers Studio
Location MS Oversize/Drawer 7/Folder 1
Creator Bate Studios
Distributor No
Photo Date Early 1870s
Medium B&W
Original Format Print
Size 10x12
File Name 1985-0146-0062.jpg
Rights Reproduction requires permission. Digital images property of SHM Library & Archives.
Staff Notes This is a full head to toe portrait and matches 1985-0146-0001, which is a cropped version of this photo. BST
Description John Bennett Townsend (b. 1835 – d. 1873) was born July 28, 1835 in Kentucky. He and his family grew up in Texas. He met and married Elizabeth "Lizzie" (Vickers) Townsend, later Aldridge, and they had six children – Clara Becker Vroom, Dee Townsend, Lula Townsend (died when she was sixteen), Ora Coleman French, Chancy Townsend and John “Ben” Townsend, Jr. He migrated to Arizona in 1865, along with his father-in-law, John Vickers and they settled in the lower Aqua Fria region southeast of the present town of Mayer and began farming the land. He was a Confederate soldier during the Civil War, an Army scout and Indian fighter excellent rifleman. In June, 1871, he led a successful raid against Apaches and recovered most of the cattle stolen. He was presented with an engraved Henry rifle, which was placed in the Masonic Temple. He was killed September 16, 1873 near Prescott, Yavapai, Arizona Territory, at Dripping Springs after tracking single-handed, eight Apaches who had raided his home garden. When his body was found, it was not mutilated by the Apaches, which was unusual at this time. John's body was disinterred and finally laid to rest in the Prescott Masonic Cemetery.