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Washington School Kindergarten class at Governor's Mansion at Sharlot Hall Museum
Sharlot M. Hall Traveling Through the Arizona Strip by Lake
Sharlot Hall stone building at museum
Milda Boblett
Rosa Boblett
Sharlot Hall and group at Highway Monument dedication
Sharlot Hall, James Hall and four others on porch
Orchard Ranch house with windmill at right
Sharlot M. Hall at twenty-two
Sharlot Hall and man seated before Picture Rock
John Mahony and Ginger at musuem
Sharlot Hall and man wading in stream
Sharlot Hall seated on ground before baskets
Orchard Ranch in winter with bare trees at left
Sharlot at Mercy Hospital desk
Charles Boblett baby photo
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Sharlot Hall and James Hall at Orchard Ranch gate

Sharlot Hall and James Hall at Orchard Ranch gate

Sharlot Hall and her father, James, standing before Orchard Ranch gate. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizonas vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. James Knox Polk Hall (b. December 2, 1844, died September 3, 1925) was born in Missouri to Mary Bradley Hall, who died shortly after his birth, and John Wesley Hall, who left him in the care of a neighbor, eventually dying in 1859 in Olathe, Kansas. James was raised in a crude frontier settlement and had no formal education. He enlisted in a Kansas regiment during the Civil War and worked as a scout, guide and buffalo hunter on the Kansas plains until meeting and marrying Adeline Susannah Boblett on January 31, 1869. They lived on Prosser Creek in Lincoln County, Kansas where their first child, Sharlot Mabridth, was born on October 27, 1870, followed in 1874 by a son, Edward V. (Ted). In 1879 the family moved to a region of ranches north of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) line where James turned to cattle ranching. After Adeline's father located a mining claim in the Lynx Creek area near the Arizona Territory's town of Prescott, James and Adeline's brother, Sam Boblett, moved their families to Arizona in 1881. The Halls found a small ranch in an area called Lonesome Valley, where they began raising cattle. Adeline died in 1912 and James continued to live at Orchard Ranch until his death on September 3, 1925.


Horses at Orchard Ranch

Horses at Orchard Ranch

Horses in front of fence at Orchard Ranch. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.


Sharlot Hall, James Hall and four others on porch

Sharlot Hall, James Hall and four others on porch

Three men sitting on porch, Sharlot Hall and James Hall in chairs, a woman in chair on left. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizonas vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. James Knox Polk Hall (b. December 2, 1844, d. September 3, 1925) was born in Missouri to Mary Bradley Hall, who died shortly after his birth, and John Wesley Hall, who left him in the care of a neighbor, eventually dying in 1859 in Olathe, Kansas. James was raised in a crude frontier settlement and had no formal education. He enlisted in a Kansas regiment during the Civil War and worked as a scout, guide, and buffalo hunter on the Kansas plains until meeting and marrying Adeline Susannah Boblett on January 31, 1869. They lived on Prosser Creek in Lincoln County, Kansas where their first child, Sharlot Madridth was born on October 27, 1870, followed in 1874 by a son, Edward V. (Ted). In 1879 the family moved to a region of ranches north of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) line where James turned to cattle ranching. After Adeline’s father located a mining claim in the Lynx Creek area near the Arizona Territory’s town of Prescott, James Hall and Adeline’s brother, Sam Boblett, moved their families to Arizona in 1881. The Halls found a small ranch in an area called Lonesome Valley, where they began raising cattle. Adeline died in 1912 and he operated Orchard Ranch for many years thereafter with the help of Sharlot.


Adeline Hall with chicken

Adeline Hall with chicken

Adeline Susannah (Boblett) Hall, Sharlot Hall's mother, seated with chicken at Orchard Ranch.


Sharlot M. Hall at her Writing Desk

Sharlot M. Hall at her Writing Desk

Sharlot M. Hall at her Writing Desk


Sharlot Hall holding tool in Governors Mansion

Sharlot Hall holding tool in Governors Mansion

Sharlot M. Hall holding tool and standing among treasures in Governors Mansion.


Sharlot Hall standing at open gate

Sharlot Hall standing at open gate

Sharlot Hall standing at open gate at Orchard Ranch. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.


Sharlot and James Hall and Alice Hewins on hill

Sharlot and James Hall and Alice Hewins on hill

Sharlot Hall seated, Alice Hewins lying, and James Hall standing and aiming rifle on hill overlooking mountain valley on trip to Northern Arizona. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Alice Butterfield Hewins (b. May 26, 1878, d. October 3, 1963) was born in Sacramento, California, graduated from Stanford University with a degree in Library Science and in 1901 joined her mother and her mother's husband, W. P. Nichols, in Phoenix. She taught at Stanford and the University of Arizona and helped organize the Phoenix Library where she later worked as assistant librarian. In 1904 she met Sharlot Hall, who became her lifelong friend. She married Levi Edwin Hewins in 1907 and they frequently visited Sharlot at Orchard Ranch until Levi's death in 1936. She became a resident of the Arizona Pioneer Home in 1963 shortly before her death.James Knox Polk Hall (b. December 2, 1844, d. September 3, 1925) was born in Missouri to Mary Bradley Hall, who died shortly after his birth, and John Wesley Hall, who left him in the care of a neighbor, eventually dying in 1859 in Olathe, Kansas. James was raised in a crude frontier settlement and had no formal education. He enlisted in a Kansas regiment during the Civil War and worked as a scout, guide, and buffalo hunter on the Kansas plains until meeting and marrying Adeline Susannah Boblett on January 31, 1869. They lived on Prosser Creek in Lincoln County, Kansas where their first child, Sharlot Madridth was born on October 27, 1870, followed in 1874 by a son, Edward V. (Ted). In 1879 the family moved to a region of ranches north of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) line where James turned to cattle ranching. After Adeline’s father located a mining claim in the Lynx Creek area near the Arizona Territory’s town of Prescott, James Hall and Adeline’s brother, Sam Boblett, moved their families to Arizona in 1881. The Halls found a small ranch in an area called Lonesome Valley, where they began raising cattle. Adeline died in 1912 and he operated Orchard Ranch for many years thereafter with the help of Sharlot.


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Sharlot M. Hall, SHM MS-12

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  • John C. Boblett

    John Charles Boblett (b. September 18, 1827; d. August 5, 1903), the brother of Adeline Boblett Hall, Sharlot Hall’s mother, was born in Ohio and moved to the Kansas Territory with his wife, Amanda Bryan, in 1860. He was a soldier, a postmaster, the owner of a flour mill, a County Commissioner, and a carpenter until moving with his family to Lynx Creek, Arizona in 1876 and becoming a rancher. His cattle brand 111 became well-known on the Central Arizona range. He subsequently moved to Montana, Washington and New Mexico before dying at the home of his daughter, May Hall Ross, in Utah. He and his wife had three other children, Alma Bradbury, Samuel M. and Edward J.

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  • John C. Boblett

    John Charles Boblett (b. September 18, 1827; d. August 5, 1903), the brother of Adeline Boblett Hall, Sharlot Hall’s mother, was born in Ohio and moved to the Kansas Territory with his wife, Amanda Bryan, in 1860. He was a soldier, a postmaster, the owner of a flour mill, a County Commissioner, and a carpenter until moving with his family to Lynx Creek, Arizona in 1876 and becoming a rancher. His cattle brand 111 became well-known on the Central Arizona range. He subsequently moved to Montana, Washington and New Mexico before dying at the home of his daughter, May Hall Ross, in Utah. He and his wife had three other children, Alma Bradbury, Samuel M. and Edward J.

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  • John Charles and Amanda Boblett

    John Charles Boblett (b. September 18, 1827; d. August 5, 1903) is the brother of Adeline (Boblett) Hall. Amanda Ellen (Bryan) Boblett was born December 17, 1834 and died August 2, 1915. John and Amanda are Sharlot M. Hall's uncle and aunt from her mother's side of the family.

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  • John Mahony and Ginger at musuem

    John Fitzgibbon Mahony, dog, Ginger, and cat at Sharlot Hall Museum. John Fitzgibbon Mahony (b. August 14, 1849, d. April 15, 1940) was born in County Cork, Ireland. He imigrated to the U. S. at the age of 17 and after joining General Custer's Seventh Cavalry after the Civil War, was sent to Arizona in 1866. He was primarily engaged in mining, in Arizona, California and Nevada, and he mined in Yavapai County after 1876. He served as city engineer of Prescott for nine years, during which time he was in charge of the City's water system when the first water meters were installed. He later served as superintendent of the Tonto Basin quartz mills and as engineer at the Crystal Ice Plant. Following his retirement, he was elected state commander of the United Indian War Veterans and was national commander in 1934-35. In 1927, the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to Sharlot M. Hall for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name.

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  • John, Amanda & Mary "May" Boblett

    John Charles, Amanda (Bryan) Boblett and their daughter, Mary "May." These are Sharlot's uncle, aunt and niece from her mother's, Adeline, side of the family.

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  • Mary "May" (Boblett) Ross

    Mary "May" Boblett Ross (b. July 29,1871 - d. January 21, 1966) was born in Kansas to John C. and Amanda Boblett.

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  • Mary "May" Boblett at Ten Years Old

    Mary "May (Boblett) Hall Ross (b. July 29, 1871; d. January 21, 1966) is Sharlot M. Hall's niece and was born in Kansas to John C. and Amanda Boblett. She came to Arizona with her family in 1877

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  • Men on hay wagon at Orchard Ranch

    Two men on top of hay wagon at Orchard Ranch. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.

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  • Milda Boblett

    Miss Milda Boblett, taught for many years at Panora, Iowa.

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  • Milda Boblett

    Miss Milda Boblett, taught for many years at Panora, Iowa.

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  • Montezuma Castle ruins

    Montezuma Castle ruins taken on Sharlot Hall's trip to northern Arizona. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.

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  • Mr. and Mrs. William Tipton

    William and Alice Tipton standing on steps in front of tree.

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  • Mr. and Mrs. William Tipton portrait

    William M. and Alice J. Tipton head and torso portrait photo given to Sharlot Hall.

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  • Mrs. R.L. Royal, Senator Ralph Cameron, Sharlot M. Hall & B.P. Lester

    From left to right - Mrs. R.L. Royal, U.S. Senator Ralph Cameron, Sharlot M. Hall, B. P. Lester, and unidentified woman.

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  • Orchard at Orchard Ranch with house in distance

    Orchard at Orchard Ranch with house in distance at right. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.

    Learn More |

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