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Sharlot Hall, Emma Andres & America Tomlinson
James Hall in neck scarf facing right
Sharlot in fur-collared coat
Sharlot Hall and large group of first movie colony
Sharlot Hall and seven women
Sharlot Hall having Tea with Friends
Sharlot Hall's California desk
Sharlot Hall stone building at museum
Sharlot Hall at desk with typewriter
Sharlot and James Hall at Grand Canyon
Sharlot Hall bottle-feeding piglet and petting goat
Sharlot Hall in front of Orchard Ranch
Sharlot M. Hall and her Aunt Mary "May" Boblett
Sharlot Hall, Governor Hunt, and Grace Sparkes
Edward J. Boblett as a Child
Sharlot Hall, Mrs. Robert Connell and unidentified woman
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Sharlot Hall Standing over Dead Antlered Deer

Sharlot Hall Standing over Dead Antlered Deer

Sharlot Hall holding rifle and looking straight ahead, standing over dead antlered deer head in snow.


Sharlot combing her long hair

Sharlot combing her long hair

Sharlot combing her long hair in her bedroom in Dewey.


Sharlot standing by vine in hat and fancy dress

Sharlot standing by vine in hat and fancy dress

Sharlot M. Hall standing by vine in hat and fancy dress.


Sharlot in profile seated

Sharlot in profile seated

Sharlot in profile seated in high-necked dress with large collar.


Sharlot Hall and Territorial officials

Sharlot Hall and Territorial officials

Left to right, Front row: Robert Craig, Sharlot Hall, W. C. Foster, Richard E. Sloan, George U. Young, R. A. Kirk, E. E. Kirkland, J. F. Cleaveland. Back row: Captain A. G. Stark, Kirk Moore, Captain F. S. Ingalls, L. W. Coggins, J. B. Girand, E. D. Dupass, Dr. E. E. Godfrey, Captain J. D. Corbin, A. G. Noritz. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. E. E. Kirkland (b. d. 1916 came to Arizona in the 1870's and became engaged in general merchandising at the old Vulture Mine. He later located to Kirkland valley where he farmed and raised cattle. For nearly 12 years he served as territorial treasurer. Judge Richard Elihu Sloan (b. June 22, 1857, d. December 13, 1933) was born in Ohio and arrived in Phoenix in 1884 where he established a law practice. He subsequently served as Pinal County district attorney, followed by terms as council of the 15th general assembly and associate justice of the Arizona supreme court under seven presidents. In 1909 he was appointed territorial governor until Arizona's statehood in 1912. After retirement in 1913, he served as legal advisor to the Salt River Project. He married Mary Brown in 1887 and was survived by two children.


Sharlot M. Hall and Tony Johns at Tuzigoot National Monument

Sharlot M. Hall and Tony Johns at Tuzigoot National Monument

Sharlot M. Hall and Tony Johns in group at Tuzigoot National Monument. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. October 27, 1870, d. April 9, 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Anthony Arthur (“Tony”) Johns (b. June 10, 1865; d. May 24, 1944) was born in Cornwall, England. He came to the Prescott area in 1882 to mine, and followed various mining interests in British Columbia and California before returning to Prescott to stay. He obtained citizenship in 1890 and married Cora Weaver in 1892. They had no children. He was heavily involved in community and state organizations. He was Chief of the Prescott Volunteer Fire Department, Undersheriff for Yavapai County, Superintendent of the Northern Arizona Fair, one of the incorporators of the Prescott Historical Society and Arizona Historical Society, Chairman of the Arizona State Fair Commission, and member of the Arizona Board of Regents. His political career included serving in the Arizona House of Representatives for Yavapai County and later as Speaker of the House. He also served as President of the Arizona Senate. He was chairman for the Democratic Party State Central Committee, and was appointed member of the State Highway Commission in 1932. He served as both secretary and president of the Aubrey Investment Co. which had interests in roads, mining, cattle and wool. He was a major force in the Arizona Wool Growers Association as president from 1923-1937.


Adeline Hall seated on bench at Grand Canyon facing left

Adeline Hall seated on bench at Grand Canyon facing left

Adeline Susannah (Boblett) Hall, Sharlot Hall's mother, seated on bench at Grand Canyon facing left.


Sharlot M. Hall with Parrot

Sharlot M. Hall with Parrot

Sharlot M. Hall with parrot perched on hand.


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Sharlot M. Hall, SHM MS-12

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  • Adeline Hall seated on rim of Grand Canyon

    Adeline Susannah (Boblett) Hall, Sharlot Hall's mother, seated on rim of Grand Canyon.

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  • Adeline Hall seated with book in lap

    Adeline Susannah (Boblett) Hall, Sharlot Hall's mother, seated with book in lap wearing floral dress.

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  • Adeline Hall standing among mullein at ranch

    Adeline Susannah (Boblett) Hall, Sharlot Hall's mother, standing among the mullein along the front walk of Orchard Ranch.

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  • Adeline Hall with chicken

    Adeline Susannah (Boblett) Hall, Sharlot Hall's mother, seated with chicken at Orchard Ranch.

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  • Adeline Hall with glasses on top of head

    Adeline Susannah Boblett Hall, Sharlot Hall's mother, with glasses on top of head, head and shoulders facing right.

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  • Alice J. Stevens Tipton

    Friend of Sharlot Hall; married to William "Will" M. Tipton. The front is inscribed "Sincerely Yours Alice J. Stevens"

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  • Alice J. Stevens Tipton in wedding dress

    Allice J. Stevens Tipton in wedding dress. Friend of Sharlot Hall; married to William "Will" M. Tipton.

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  • Alice J. Stevens Tipton sitting at desk

    Alice J. Stevens Tipton, sitting at desk, two views. Friend of Sharlot Hall; married to William "Will" M. Tipton.

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  • Amanda Ellen Bryan Boblett

    Amanda Ellen Bryan Boblett (b. December 17, 1834; d. August 2, 1915). She was married to John C. Boblett, Sharlot Hall's uncle, and mother to Sam, Ed, and May Boblett. They moved to Lynx Creek, Arizona in 1877.

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  • Back of stone building and pile of wood at Sharlot Hall Museum

    Back of stone bjilding and pile of wood at Sharlot Hall Museum. Photo taken when Mr. and Mrs. Ernst Behrend visited museum.

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  • Building and cows at Orchard Ranch

    Building and cows in distance at Orchard Ranch. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.

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  • Charles Boblett baby photo

    Charles Boblett (b. 1893, d. 1895), the second child of Sharlot Hall's first cousin, Samuel M. Boblett, and his wife, Minnie Bargemann.

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  • Chickens at Orchard Ranch, Dewey, Arizona

    Chickens at Orchard Ranch, Dewey, Arizona, April 4, 1926 Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.

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  • Deer at Sharlot Hall Museum

    Deer at Sharlot Hall Museum. Photo taken during visit by Mr. and Mrs. Ernst Behrend to museum.

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  • Ed, May & Sam Boblett, Cole Davis, Loy & Minnie Sever

    Left to right: Edward Boblett, Loy Sever, Samuel Boblett, Minnie Sever, May Boblett and Cole Davis. Edward J. Boblett (b. July 21, 1866; d. April 19, 1932) was born in Kansas to John C. (Sharlot Hall’s uncle) and Amanda B. Boblett. In 1876 they traveled by covered wagon to Lynx Creek, Arizona. Initially he raised cattle and later he turned to placer mining. He also helped to organize the Historical Society of Prescott. He was married to and divorced from Pearl Kebbe. They had no children. Samuel M. Boblett (b. August 3, 1862; d. July 29, 1942) was born in Kansas to John C. (Sharlot Hall’s uncle) and Amanda B. Boblett. In 1876 they traveled by covered wagon to Lynx Creek, Arizona. He was engaged in mining until entering the Arizona Pioneers’ Home in 1938. He helped his cousin, Sharlot, repair her house at Orchard Ranch as well as the Governor’s Mansion at the Sharlot Hall Museum. He married Minnie J. Borgeman in 1890, divorced her in 1901, remarried her within a month and divorced her again in 1902. They had three children, Edward L., Charles, and Walter. In 1918 he married Mellie Farra, and they subsequently had two sons, Fay and John Clayton. Mary Boblett Hall Ross (“May”) (b. July 29, 1871; d. January 21, 1966) was born in Kansas to John C. and Amanda Boblett and came to Arizona with her family in 1877. Her father, Sharlot Hall’s uncle, raised cattle, and she had her own herd of 35 by the time she was 17. She rode in the Ladies Event in Prescott’s first rodeo in 1888. She married Amos Hall in 1890 and subsequently married George Ross. Cole Davis was a stage driver and a some-time cowboy.

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