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Adeline Hall seated on rim of Grand Canyon
Sharlot M. Hall seated holding knitting
Sharlot Hall holding rifle standing before dog
Sharlot M. Hall in front of museum on Capitol Rd.
James Knox Polk Hall Casket
Sharlot Hall and Mrs. Mary Curtis at Museum
Sharlot Hall holding goose
Sharlot Hall in carriage before barrel cactus
Edward & Samuel Boblett as Children
Sharlot Hall, Alice and William Tipton in bi-plane above clouds
Orchard Ranch southwest view across the hills
Sharlot Hall holding bottle to feed pig in lap
Orchard Ranch behind fence with orchard at right
James Hall seated holding open book
Chickens at Orchard Ranch, Dewey, Arizona
Deer at Sharlot Hall Museum
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Orchard Ranch behind fence with orchard at right

Orchard Ranch behind fence with orchard at right

Orchard Ranch with fence in foreground and mountain and hill in background. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.


Orchard Ranch house ruins from side and rear behind tree

Orchard Ranch house ruins from side and rear behind tree

Orchard Ranch house 2-story side and rear view of ruined building, with tree and fence in front. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1970.


Orchard Ranch roof and orchards at left

Orchard Ranch roof and orchards at left

Orchard Ranch orchard at left and rooftop at right as seen from the hill. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.


Orchard Ranch house ruins from rear and side with water mill

Orchard Ranch house ruins from rear and side with water mill

Orchard Ranch house ruins from rear and side with water mill in background. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1970.


Sharlot Hall, young girl, holding cat and dog

Sharlot Hall, young girl, holding cat and dog

Sharlot Hall holding cat, and young unidentified girl holding dog. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.


Sharlot M. Hall Seated and Holding Book

Sharlot M. Hall Seated and Holding Book

Sharlot M. Hall seated, holding book and facing left.


Sharlot M. Hall in front of Ranchhouse on museum grounds

Sharlot M. Hall in front of Ranchhouse on museum grounds

Sharlot M. Hall standing in front of Ranchhouse under construction on museum grounds.In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. October 27, 1870, d. April 9, 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.


Horses and cows in front of fence with water mill at Orchard Ranch

Horses and cows in front of fence with water mill at Orchard Ranch

Horses and cows in front of fence, with water mill at left at Orchard Ranch. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.


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Sharlot M. Hall, SHM MS-12

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  • Adeline Hall seated on rim of Grand Canyon

    Adeline Susannah (Boblett) Hall, Sharlot Hall's mother, seated on rim of Grand Canyon.

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  • Adeline Hall seated with book in lap

    Adeline Susannah (Boblett) Hall, Sharlot Hall's mother, seated with book in lap wearing floral dress.

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  • Adeline Hall standing among mullein at ranch

    Adeline Susannah (Boblett) Hall, Sharlot Hall's mother, standing among the mullein along the front walk of Orchard Ranch.

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  • Adeline Hall with chicken

    Adeline Susannah (Boblett) Hall, Sharlot Hall's mother, seated with chicken at Orchard Ranch.

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  • Adeline Hall with glasses on top of head

    Adeline Susannah Boblett Hall, Sharlot Hall's mother, with glasses on top of head, head and shoulders facing right.

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  • Alice J. Stevens Tipton

    Friend of Sharlot Hall; married to William "Will" M. Tipton. The front is inscribed "Sincerely Yours Alice J. Stevens"

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  • Alice J. Stevens Tipton in wedding dress

    Allice J. Stevens Tipton in wedding dress. Friend of Sharlot Hall; married to William "Will" M. Tipton.

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  • Alice J. Stevens Tipton sitting at desk

    Alice J. Stevens Tipton, sitting at desk, two views. Friend of Sharlot Hall; married to William "Will" M. Tipton.

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  • Amanda Ellen Bryan Boblett

    Amanda Ellen Bryan Boblett (b. December 17, 1834; d. August 2, 1915). She was married to John C. Boblett, Sharlot Hall's uncle, and mother to Sam, Ed, and May Boblett. They moved to Lynx Creek, Arizona in 1877.

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  • Back of stone building and pile of wood at Sharlot Hall Museum

    Back of stone bjilding and pile of wood at Sharlot Hall Museum. Photo taken when Mr. and Mrs. Ernst Behrend visited museum.

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  • Building and cows at Orchard Ranch

    Building and cows in distance at Orchard Ranch. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.

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  • Charles Boblett baby photo

    Charles Boblett (b. 1893, d. 1895), the second child of Sharlot Hall's first cousin, Samuel M. Boblett, and his wife, Minnie Bargemann.

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  • Chickens at Orchard Ranch, Dewey, Arizona

    Chickens at Orchard Ranch, Dewey, Arizona, April 4, 1926 Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.

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  • Deer at Sharlot Hall Museum

    Deer at Sharlot Hall Museum. Photo taken during visit by Mr. and Mrs. Ernst Behrend to museum.

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  • Ed, May & Sam Boblett, Cole Davis, Loy & Minnie Sever

    Left to right: Edward Boblett, Loy Sever, Samuel Boblett, Minnie Sever, May Boblett and Cole Davis. Edward J. Boblett (b. July 21, 1866; d. April 19, 1932) was born in Kansas to John C. (Sharlot Hall’s uncle) and Amanda B. Boblett. In 1876 they traveled by covered wagon to Lynx Creek, Arizona. Initially he raised cattle and later he turned to placer mining. He also helped to organize the Historical Society of Prescott. He was married to and divorced from Pearl Kebbe. They had no children. Samuel M. Boblett (b. August 3, 1862; d. July 29, 1942) was born in Kansas to John C. (Sharlot Hall’s uncle) and Amanda B. Boblett. In 1876 they traveled by covered wagon to Lynx Creek, Arizona. He was engaged in mining until entering the Arizona Pioneers’ Home in 1938. He helped his cousin, Sharlot, repair her house at Orchard Ranch as well as the Governor’s Mansion at the Sharlot Hall Museum. He married Minnie J. Borgeman in 1890, divorced her in 1901, remarried her within a month and divorced her again in 1902. They had three children, Edward L., Charles, and Walter. In 1918 he married Mellie Farra, and they subsequently had two sons, Fay and John Clayton. Mary Boblett Hall Ross (“May”) (b. July 29, 1871; d. January 21, 1966) was born in Kansas to John C. and Amanda Boblett and came to Arizona with her family in 1877. Her father, Sharlot Hall’s uncle, raised cattle, and she had her own herd of 35 by the time she was 17. She rode in the Ladies Event in Prescott’s first rodeo in 1888. She married Amos Hall in 1890 and subsequently married George Ross. Cole Davis was a stage driver and a some-time cowboy.

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