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Sharlot Hall sitting among rocks
Sharlot at Mercy Hospital desk
Sharlot Hall sitting on stone by flagpole
James Hall seated holding open book
Orchard Ranch house ruins from side and rear behind tree
Edward & Samuel Boblett as Children
Two views of Sharlot in long striped dress
Snow-covered trees at Orchard Ranch
Sharlot Hall, James Hall and four others on porch
Sharlot Hall, C. M. Holbert and Winifred Hynds
Uncle Dick Thomas of Dewey
Sharlot in cameo looking down
Orchard Ranch seen from hill.
Sharlot M. Hall and Mary Curtis
Sharlot Hall's dog, Watch, standing
Sharlot standing by vine in hat and fancy dress
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Sharlot M. Hall with Parrot

Sharlot M. Hall with Parrot

Sharlot M. Hall with parrot perched on hand.


Sharlot M. Hall, Mr. and Mrs. Behrend in front of museum buildings

Sharlot M. Hall, Mr. and Mrs. Behrend in front of museum buildings

Sharlot M. Hall standing with Mr. and Mrs. Behrend in front of Museum buildings .In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. October 27, 1870, d. April 9, 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Mary Brownell Behrend (b.December 26,1879, d. July 5, 1976), nicknamed Molly, was a Newport, Rhode Island debutante before marrying Ernst Behrend in 1907. The couple had two children. Their only son died in a traffic accident in 1929, and after her husband’s death in 1940, she donated the family’s country estate, the Glenhill farmhouse and the 400 acres surrounding it, to Penn State University. The Behrend Center was dedicated in 1940 as a memorial to Ernst and it later became Penn State Erie, The Behrend College. Mrs. Behrend became known as the “mother” of Penn State Behrend. Ernst Richard Behrend (b. March 29,1869, d. September 22, 1940) was born in Germany and after receiving an engineering degree, he emigrated to the United States in 1896 and worked in the paper industry. After his father raised the investment capital to build a sulfite pulp and paper mill, he co-founded, with his father and brother, the Hammermill Paper Company in Erie, Pennsylvania. Mr. Behrend served as its president for its first 40 years, and by the late 1920’s, the company had about 80% of the paper market. He was a prominent civic leader in Erie, serving on a number of boards until his death in 1940. He was inducted into the Paper Industry International Hall of Fame in 2012.


Sharlot Hall in Copper Dress - Seated Facing Right

Sharlot Hall in Copper Dress - Seated Facing Right

Sharlot M. Hall seated on bench wearing copper dress, facing right, which she wore to Washington, D.C. to deliver Arizona's electoral vote in March of 1925.


Sharlot Hall, Leo Layton, bus and car

Sharlot Hall, Leo Layton, bus and car

Sharlot Hall, Leo Layton and unidentified man with horse, car and bus on trip to northern Arizona. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.


Sharlot Hall, Mrs. Charles Clark and Honorable W.W. Brookner

Sharlot Hall, Mrs. Charles Clark and Honorable W.W. Brookner

Sharlot Hall, Mrs. Charles M. Clark and Honorable W. W. Brookner, r. to l. standing in front of log building. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizonas vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Mrs. Charles M. Clark, the former Dora E. Haugh of San Francisco, married Charles M. Clark in Globe in 1880. He was a telegraph operator, miner, merchant, assayer, postmaster, and at his death in 1937 had served as President of the Arizona Pioneers Association since 1923.


 Sharlot M. Hall's Uncle - John Charles Boblett

Sharlot M. Hall's Uncle - John Charles Boblett

John Charles Boblett (b. September 18, 1827; d. August 5, 1903) is the brother of Adeline (Boblett) Hall and uncle to Sharlot M. Hall.


Orchard Ranch behind fence with orchard at right

Orchard Ranch behind fence with orchard at right

Orchard Ranch with fence in foreground and mountain and hill in background. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.


Adeline Hall and unidentified woman

Adeline Hall and unidentified woman

Adeline Hall and unidentified woman standing in front of flowering tree.


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Sharlot M. Hall, SHM MS-12

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