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Search results for 'barlow massicks'

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  • Barlow-Massicks, Thomas Gibson

    Thomas Gibson Barlow-Massicks Newspaper articles, biography and history of his Victorian home (castle) east of Prescott

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  • Sharlot Hall, James Hall, woman panning for gold and 3 men

    Sharlot Hall, one woman panning for gold, James Hall, T. G. Barlow-Massicks, H. A. Swann, and unidentified man watching her at Lynx Creek. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. James Knox Polk Hall (b. December 2, 1844, d. September 3, 1925) was born in Missouri to Mary Bradley Hall, who died shortly after his birth, and John Wesley Hall, who left him in the care of a neighbor, eventually dying in 1859 in Olathe, Kansas. James was raised in a crude frontier settlement and had no formal education. He enlisted in a Kansas regiment during the Civil War and worked as a scout, guide, and buffalo hunter on the Kansas plains until meeting and marrying Adeline Susannah Boblett on January 31, 1869. They lived on Prosser Creek in Lincoln County, Kansas where their first child, Sharlot Madridth was born on October 27, 1870, followed in 1874 by a son, Edward V. (Ted). In 1879 the family moved to a region of ranches north of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) line where James turned to cattle ranching. After Adeline’s father located a mining claim in the Lynx Creek area near the Arizona Territory’s town of Prescott, James Hall and Adeline’s brother, Sam Boblett, moved their families to Arizona in 1881. The Halls found a small ranch in an area called Lonesome Valley, where they began raising cattle. Adeline died in 1912 and he operated Orchard Ranch for many years thereafter with the help of Sharlot. Thomas Gibson Barlow-Massicks (b. June 12,1862, d. April 13, 1899) was born in Cumberland, England and moved to Yavapai County, Arizona in 1891, joining his sister, Elizabeth and brother-in-law, William Pedley, in the Prescott area. They worked for the Lynx Creek Gold and Land Company Limited of Manchester, England initially, but in 1892, along with Herbert Arthur Swann, they formed the Lynx Creek Gold and Land Company, Inc. The company included ranges for grazing, an orchard and a canning facility. Massicks and Swann filed numerous mining claims in the early 1890's, and in 1895, Massicks built a store, a stamp mill, and other buildings which formed the town of Massicks, as well as a large Victorian house, called "The Castle." He died at the age of 36 from wounds suffered when a revolver discharged accidentally during a wagon ride on the rough Copper Basin Road.

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  • Sharlot Hall, one woman and four men panning for gold at Lynx Creek.

    Sharlot Hall, James Hall, T. Barlow-Massicks, H.A. Swann and unidentified woman and man panning for gold at Lynx Creek. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. James Knox Polk Hall (b. December 2, 1844, d. September 3, 1925) was born in Missouri to Mary Bradley Hall, who died shortly after his birth, and John Wesley Hall, who left him in the care of a neighbor, eventually dying in 1859 in Olathe, Kansas. James was raised in a crude frontier settlement and had no formal education. He enlisted in a Kansas regiment during the Civil War and worked as a scout, guide, and buffalo hunter on the Kansas plains until meeting and marrying Adeline Susannah Boblett on January 31, 1869. They lived on Prosser Creek in Lincoln County, Kansas where their first child, Sharlot Madridth was born on October 27, 1870, followed in 1874 by a son, Edward V. (Ted). In 1879 the family moved to a region of ranches north of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) line where James turned to cattle ranching. After Adeline’s father located a mining claim in the Lynx Creek area near the Arizona Territory’s town of Prescott, James Hall and Adeline’s brother, Sam Boblett, moved their families to Arizona in 1881. The Halls found a small ranch in an area called Lonesome Valley, where they began raising cattle. Adeline died in 1912 and he operated Orchard Ranch for many years thereafter with the help of Sharlot. Thomas Gibson Barlow-Massicks (b. June 12, 1862, d. April 13, 1899) was born in Cumberland, England and moved to Yavapai County, Arizona in 1891, joining his sister, Elizabeth, and brother-in-law, William Pedley, in the Prescott area. They worked for the Lynx Creek Gold and Land Company Limited of Manchester, England initially, but in 1892 along with Herbert Arthur Swann, they formed the Lynx Creek Gold and Land Company, Inc. They filed numerous mining claims in the early 1890's, and in 1895, Massicks built a store, a stamp mill, and other buildings which formed the town of Massicks, as well as a large Victorian house, called "The Castle." He died from wounds suffered when a revolver discharged accidentally during a wagon ride on the rough Copper Basin Road.

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  • Sharlot Hall and 5 others panning for gold

    Sharlot Hall, James Hall, Thomas Barlow- Massicks, Herbert Arthur Swann, an unidentified man and woman panning for gold at Lynx Creek. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. James Knox Polk Hall (b. December 2, 1844, d. September 3, 1925) was born in Missouri to Mary Bradley Hall, who died shortly after his birth, and John Wesley Hall, who left him in the care of a neighbor, eventually dying in 1859 in Olathe, Kansas. James was raised in a crude frontier settlement and had no formal education. He enlisted in a Kansas regiment during the Civil War and worked as a scout, guide, and buffalo hunter on the Kansas plains until meeting and marrying Adeline Susannah Boblett on January 31, 1869. They lived on Prosser Creek in Lincoln County, Kansas where their first child, Sharlot Madridth was born on October 27, 1870, followed in 1874 by a son, Edward V. (Ted). In 1879 the family moved to a region of ranches north of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) line where James turned to cattle ranching. After Adeline’s father located a mining claim in the Lynx Creek area near the Arizona Territory’s town of Prescott, James Hall and Adeline’s brother, Sam Boblett, moved their families to Arizona in 1881. The Halls found a small ranch in an area called Lonesome Valley, where they began raising cattle. Adeline died in 1912 and he operated Orchard Ranch for many years thereafter with the help of Sharlot. Thomas Gibson Barlow-Massicks (b. June 12,1862, d. April 13,1899) was born in Cumberland, England and moved to Yavapai County, Arizona in 1891, joining his sister, Elizabeth, and brother-in-law, William Pedley, in the Prescott area. They worked for the Lynx Creek Gold and Land Company Limited of Manchester, England initially, but in 1892, along with Herbert Arthur Swann, they formed the Lynx Creek Gold and Land Company, Inc. The company included ranges for grazing, an orchard and a canning facility. Massicks and Swann filed numerous mining claims in the early 1890's, and in 1895, Massicks built a store, a stamp mill, and other buildings, which formed the town of Massicks, as well as a large Victorian house, called "The Castle." He died at the age of 36 from wounds suffered when a revolver discharged accidentally during a wagon ride on the rough Copper Basin Road.

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  • Barlow, Lani Eldridge

    Had lived in Arizona for 31 years, previous residence was in California. COD: cardiopulmonary arrest due to cancer of the bile ducts. Mt. View Crematory in Prescott and Westcott Funeral Home in Cottonwood were in charge of the arrangements. YCRR

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  • Barlow, L. Keith Jr.

    Had lived in Arizona for 32 years, previous residence was in Tennessee. Had been living in Dewey, Yavapai, Arizona prior to being admitted to Hospice of the Valley - Eckstein Center in Scottsdale, Maricopa, Arizona. COD: embolic stroke & bladder cancer. Hansen Mortuary in Phoenix was in charge of the arrangements, Sunrise Crematory in Prescott Valley assisted. YCRR

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  • Barlow, Anna Marie

    Had lived in Arizona for 5 years, previous residence was in California. Had been living in Congress, Yavapai, Arizona prior to being admitted to a care center in Peoria. COD: Alzheimer's disease. Serenity Crematory Service in Phoenix and Frey Funeral Home in Wickenburg, Maricopa, Arizona were in charge of the arrangements. YCRR

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  • Barlow, Ernest E

    Arizona Death certificate: Had been at Fort Whipple for 7 weeks and in Arizona for 3 years. Usual residence was in Wickenburg, Maricopa, Arizona. COD: primary carcinoma of the pancreas. Remains were shipped to Sringfield, Vermont for the final arrangements.

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  • Barlow, James E

    NOTE: the above date is a cremation date from the files of the Mt. View Crematorium. Memory Chapel (now Heritage Memory Mortuary) was in charge of the arrangements.

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  • Thurman, Harry Windfield

    Mt. View cemetery records show a burial date of 16 Jan 1962, Northern Arizona Mortuary Records 1936 - 1969, Arizona Death Certificate: Had been in Prescott for 5 years and in Arizona for 15 years. Usual residence was in Granite Dells north of Prescott. COD: generalized peritonitis due to acute inter colitis. Burial was in the Mt. View Cemetery in Prescott.

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  • Haggard, Charles Vernon

    Buried 2 Nov 1992. OBIT: To Arizona from Michigan in 1975. Worked at Southern MI State Prison in Jackson, Michigan, YCRR: COD: heart failure. Westcott Funeral Home in Cottonwood was in charge of the arrangements. ÿ

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  • Thompson, Mary Louise

    Death Cert--3 months old, COD malnutrition, died at Hassayampa ÿAlfalfa Farms Company near Prescott, father born in Texas, mother born in Mississippi

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  • Resley, James F

    OBIT: Prescott Courier, 28 Feb 1971: Had worked in the City Water department from 1961-1967. Was residing in Camp Verde at the time of his death. ÿDuring WWII, he lived in Mesa and worked at Williams Air Force Base for 5 years. He had worked at the mines in Copper Basin and at the Drake rock quarries for 10 years. Survivors included a son, James F. Jr. of Mesa; 3 daughters, Mrs. Ruth Stewart of Ignacio, Colorado, Mrs. Francis Lamontague of Sunnyslope, Arizona and Mrs. Lois Muller of Phoenix; 3 sisters, Mrs. Fred Patton of Skull Valley; Mrs. Floyd Barlow of Sheilton, Washington and Mrs. Ora Arington of Vider, Texas; 15 grandchildren and numerous nieces of nephews. Memory Chapel (now Heritage Memory Mortuary) was in charge of the arrangements.

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Items 1 to 15 of 21 total

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