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Search results for 'Indian hill'

Items 1 to 15 of 4191 total

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  • Smith, Homer

    Arizona Death Certificate: Was listed as Indian probably buried in Middle Verde Indian Cemetery. COD Extensive gasoline burns from a car fire. e

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  • Shaggie, Romaine Roy

    Arizona Death Certificate: was a life long resident of Arizona. COD: internal hemorrhage due to a ruptured liver. Had been in an automobile accident. Had been living on the Indian Reservation in Middle Verde, Yavapai, Arizona. Wescott Funeral Home in Cottonwood was in charge of the arrangements.

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  • Shaggie, Lyme

    Arizona Death Certificate; COD; no doctor called; Probably buried in Middle Verde Indian Tribual Cemetery- race listed at Yavapai/Apache

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  • Hill, Mammie

    Arizona Death Certificate; COD:Influenza?; Camp Verde Indian Cemetery

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  • Parker, Jay

    Death certificate: COD: natural causes - found dead. Had lived in Arizona for 12 years, Oak Creek for 11 months.

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  • Sharlot M. Hall and James Hall on hill above Orchard Ranch

    Sharlot M. Hall and her father, James Hall walking on hill above Orchard Ranch. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. October 27, 1870, d. April 9, 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. James Knox Polk Hall (b. December 2, 1844, d. September 3, 1925) was born in Missouri to Mary Bradley Hall, who died shortly after his birth, and John Wesley Hall, who left him in the care of a neighbor, eventually dying in 1859 in Olathe, Kansas. James was raised in a crude frontier settlement and had no formal education. He enlisted in a Kansas regiment during the Civil War and worked as a scout, guide, and buffalo hunter on the Kansas plains until meeting and marrying Adeline Susannah Boblett on January 31, 1869. They lived on Prosser Creek in Lincoln County, Kansas where their first child, Sharlot Madridth was born on October 27, 1870, followed in 1874 by a son, Edward V. (Ted). In 1879 the family moved to a region of ranches north of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) line where James turned to cattle ranching. After Adeline’s father located a mining claim in the Lynx Creek area near the Arizona Territory’s town of Prescott, James Hall and Adeline’s brother, Sam Boblett, moved their families to Arizona in 1881. The Halls found a small ranch in an area called Lonesome Valley, where they began raising cattle. Adeline died in 1912 and he operated Orchard Ranch for many years thereafter with the help of Sharlot.

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  • Sharlot M. Hall and father, James Hall on hill at Orchard Ranch

    Sharlot M. Hall and father, James Hall, walking on hill above Orchard Ranch. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. October 27, 1870, d. April 9, 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. James Knox Polk Hall (b. December 2, 1844, d. September 3, 1925) was born in Missouri to Mary Bradley Hall, who died shortly after his birth, and John Wesley Hall, who left him in the care of a neighbor, eventually dying in 1859 in Olathe, Kansas. James was raised in a crude frontier settlement and had no formal education. He enlisted in a Kansas regiment during the Civil War and worked as a scout, guide, and buffalo hunter on the Kansas plains until meeting and marrying Adeline Susannah Boblett on January 31, 1869. They lived on Prosser Creek in Lincoln County, Kansas where their first child, Sharlot Madridth was born on October 27, 1870, followed in 1874 by a son, Edward V. (Ted). In 1879 the family moved to a region of ranches north of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) line where James turned to cattle ranching. After Adeline’s father located a mining claim in the Lynx Creek area near the Arizona Territory’s town of Prescott, James Hall and Adeline’s brother, Sam Boblett, moved their families to Arizona in 1881. The Halls found a small ranch in an area called Lonesome Valley, where they began raising cattle. Adeline died in 1912 and he operated Orchard Ranch for many years thereafter with the help of Sharlot.

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  • Grief Hill

    Account of Indian fight

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  • Sharlot and James Hall and Alice Hewins on hill

    Sharlot Hall seated, Alice Hewins lying, and James Hall standing and aiming rifle on hill overlooking mountain valley on trip to Northern Arizona. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Alice Butterfield Hewins (b. May 26, 1878, d. October 3, 1963) was born in Sacramento, California, graduated from Stanford University with a degree in Library Science and in 1901 joined her mother and her mother's husband, W. P. Nichols, in Phoenix. She taught at Stanford and the University of Arizona and helped organize the Phoenix Library where she later worked as assistant librarian. In 1904 she met Sharlot Hall, who became her lifelong friend. She married Levi Edwin Hewins in 1907 and they frequently visited Sharlot at Orchard Ranch until Levi's death in 1936. She became a resident of the Arizona Pioneer Home in 1963 shortly before her death.James Knox Polk Hall (b. December 2, 1844, d. September 3, 1925) was born in Missouri to Mary Bradley Hall, who died shortly after his birth, and John Wesley Hall, who left him in the care of a neighbor, eventually dying in 1859 in Olathe, Kansas. James was raised in a crude frontier settlement and had no formal education. He enlisted in a Kansas regiment during the Civil War and worked as a scout, guide, and buffalo hunter on the Kansas plains until meeting and marrying Adeline Susannah Boblett on January 31, 1869. They lived on Prosser Creek in Lincoln County, Kansas where their first child, Sharlot Madridth was born on October 27, 1870, followed in 1874 by a son, Edward V. (Ted). In 1879 the family moved to a region of ranches north of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) line where James turned to cattle ranching. After Adeline’s father located a mining claim in the Lynx Creek area near the Arizona Territory’s town of Prescott, James Hall and Adeline’s brother, Sam Boblett, moved their families to Arizona in 1881. The Halls found a small ranch in an area called Lonesome Valley, where they began raising cattle. Adeline died in 1912 and he operated Orchard Ranch for many years thereafter with the help of Sharlot.

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  • Jones, Ernest "Ernie" Sr.

    Obituary and memorial service program for Ernest "Ernie" Jones Sr. Born July 19, 1943 Died September 16. 2018. First Tribal Police Officer for the Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribe and member of the Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribal Board of Directors.

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  • Native American - General

    4 stories written by Claire H. Jordan entitled as follows: "Believe It or Not" or "Happy Days" "Harvest Dance of the Tewa Indians" "The Deer Hunter or Prehistoric Talkies" "Yesterday and Today" Also includes a copy of the January 2015 issue of True West Magazine entitled "The 100 Best Historical Photos of the American Indian".

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  • Publications - Frontier Times

    Articles copied from the following Frontier Times Publications: October 1923 Taming Apache Followers of Geronimo Arizona Indian Wars February 1924: Arizona's Canyon of Gold Still Being Sought May 1924: Early History of Arizona

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  • Utilities - Water

    This subject is contained in 2 files. Newspaper articles regarding the water supply for the Prescott Area. Engineer's report regarding the Prescott Water System. Daily Courier article regarding the water and sewer rate hikes dated 12/3/14. Article entitled " Pumps, Pipes and People: A History of Prescott's Waterworks". City of Prescott 2013 report on the drinking water of Prescott. City of Prescott Prescott Water Committee file of George S. Hill dated 1947 thru 1971.

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  • Gatewood, Charles

    Days Past article entitled Lt. Charles Gatewood - Forgotten defender of Indian Rights. Also includes article entitled " A Frontier Regiment in the Apache Wars" written by Major Roy L. Goodale, (USAF Ret.)

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  • Schools - Indian Schools

    Newspaper articles regarding different Indian Schools in Arizona including Phoenix Indian School, San Carlos Indian School and Sacaton Indian School.

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Items 1 to 15 of 4191 total

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