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Set Descending Direction

By Mick Woodcock

Based on the Days Past article of Nov 29, 2014.

What follows are excerpts from articles about Christmas in early Prescott. We hope this will give you an idea of what our predecessors thought of the holiday and how they observed it.

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Posted in 2016 By Tom Schmidt

Mining at McCabe

Dec 14, 2016 11:03:55 AM

By Dana Brisendine Sharp

McCabe, Arizona, once a thriving town . . . is no more.  Located in the Big Bug Mining District, the little town was about four miles southwest of Humboldt and a couple miles from the Huron siding on the Prescott and Middleton Branch of the AT & SF Railroad.

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Posted in 2016 By Tom Schmidt

By Bob Harner

Despite risking his life to successfully persuade Geronimo to surrender for the last time, Lieutenant Charles Gatewood remains largely unacknowledged today, primarily because his unyielding commitment to defending the rights of Apache  men and women (the term “Apache” includes what today are known as Yavapai) alienated him from his Army superiors and peers.

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Posted in 2016 By Tom Schmidt

By Alexandra Piacenza

From their beginnings, Sacred Heart’s and Prescott’s history have been entwined. As early as 1540 Catholic priest Father Juan de Padilla, a spiritual leader of the Coronado expedition, may have encountered some of the native people of the area as the expedition traveled east of Arizona's central highlands. Church history suggests that it would be more than 230 years before they may have been visited again, this time by Franciscan missionary Father Francisco Hermenegildo Garcés in 1776. Yet another century passed before the first resident pastor, Father F.C. Becker, arrived.

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Posted in 2016 By Tom Schmidt

Whiskey Row’s Virgil Earp

Nov 25, 2016 12:56:13 PM

By Brad Courtney©

So great is the shadow cast by Tombstone’s 1881 shootout at the OK Corral, it isn’t widely known that the law-enforcement career of Virgil Earp began in Prescott. Its launching point was a prominent saloon on Whiskey Row.

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Posted in 2016 By Tom Schmidt

A Thanksgiving to Remember

Nov 16, 2016 10:26:42 AM

By Brad Courtney©

In October 1868, after Albert Noyes, early Prescott’s lumber magnate, completed his much anticipated 3600 square-foot, two-story building on the southwest corner of Montezuma and Gurley Streets, he decided to sell it to Andrew “Doc” Moeller, owner of Granite Street’s legendary Quartz Rock Saloon. Prescottonians were excited, because “Moeller’s new building” marked the newest step in Prescott’s evolution. It would function as the village’s centerpiece, go-to saloon, and meeting place for civic organizations for many years.

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Posted in 2016 By Tom Schmidt

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Set Descending Direction