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Set Descending Direction

By Brenda Taylor

“Bail out!” yelled the pilot to his flight crew.  “One engine is lost to fire and the others have conked out, bail out – NOW!”  At this order, the bomb bay doors dropped open and three of the crewmen jumped into the moonless night.  Surprisingly, before the co-pilot and radioman could jump, the pilot was able to bring the windmilling propellers to life and the bomber limped away to make an emergency landing at the Kingman Army Air Field.

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Posted in 2014 By LaDawn Dalton

By Mick Woodcock

What follows are excerpts from articles about Christmas in Prescott from selected years during the 1870s.  We hope this will give you an idea of what our predecessors thought of the holiday and how they observed it.

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Posted in 2014 By LaDawn Dalton

By Al Bates

When Arizona’s third territorial governor, Anson P. K. Safford, arrived at the Territorial Capital of Tucson in July 1869 he was met both by an enthusiastic citizenry and by a legal firestorm that threatened extended chaos in the territory.  The eventual solution would include giving the new governor temporary dictatorial powers.

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Posted in 2014 By LaDawn Dalton

By Al Bates

The portability of Arizona Territory’s seat of government—Prescott to Tucson to Prescott to Phoenix—earned it the nickname of “Capital on Wheels.”

It began when Governor Goodwin told the first legislature at Prescott in late 1864, that “permanent” location of the territory’s seat of government was at the discretion of the legislature and the governor, but that he would yield to the legislature’s “knowledge of the territory and of the wishes and interests of the people … to determine that question satisfactorily.”

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Posted in 2014 By LaDawn Dalton

By Al Bates 

This article ends the Days Past sesquicentennial series covering Arizona Territory’s earliest two years from a Prescott perspective.

The first Arizona Territorial Legislature adjourned on November 10, 1864, leaving behind a solid record of accomplishment headed by adoption of the Howell Code, a comprehensive set of laws for the territory.  A major part of that effort was establishment of the territory’s original four counties and providing for their administration.

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Posted in 2014 By LaDawn Dalton

Yavapai Arizona, Mother of Counties

Nov 1, 2014 10:29:00 AM

By Elisabeth Ruffner 

Among the myriad counties created in the United States over the earliest years of this democratic republic, Yavapai County in the Arizona Territory was the largest ever devised.  Of the original 65,000 square miles designated when Arizona Territory was organized, other entirely new counties were later carved out.

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Posted in 2014 By LaDawn Dalton

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Set Descending Direction