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This article is one of a series that will appear in this space during this year and the next on historic events relating to the Arizona Territory’s Sesquicentennial.

By Al Bates

Governor John Goodwin and his party left Fort Wingate, New Mexico, on December 20, 1863, after a wait for the heavy wagons to catch up and be readied.  In addition to the two companies of cavalry that served as their escort and their heavy freight wagons, they were accompanied by a number of freight wagons owned by New Mexican merchants and by their “500 steers, that always went ahead opening the road,” according Captain RafaelChacón of the escort.

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Posted in 2013 By LaDawn Dalton

By Jay W. Eby

The Territory of Arizona became a fact when President A. Lincoln signed the bill on February 24, 1863, yet the newly appointed governor and other territorial officers would spend Christmas that year still in New Mexico traveling to the new territory.  But a most distinguished guest, nonetheless, celebrated Christmas in the area that would become Prescott.

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Posted in 2013 By LaDawn Dalton

This article is one of a series that will appear in this space during this year and the next on historic events relating to the Arizona Territory’s Sesquicentennial.

By Al Bates 

The next stage of the cross-country trip for Governor John Goodwin’s party of Arizona territorial officials took them quickly from Fort Union to Santa Fe where they began to encounter a series of delays.  And then on to Albuquerque to experience yet more delays.  It was not until December 8, 1863, that they were finally on the way to Fort Wingate, the last lonely outpost of civilization before reaching Fort Whipple—if it would exist and if they could find it, both events expected but not guaranteed.

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Posted in 2013 By LaDawn Dalton

By John P. Langellier

For over a century and half the United States Army has had a presence in the Grand Canyon State.  Scores of forts, cantonments, and camps provided military protection, as well as contributing to the local economy and the social life in the areas that surrounded them.  Most of the often-isolated outposts have long since disappeared, but some of the garrisons continue to play a significant role in Arizona to this day.  Fortunately several of these sites have museums where the past comes alive through exhibits and programs.

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Posted in 2013 By LaDawn Dalton

By Melissa Ruffner 

Nantucket, Massachusetts, was the third richest community in the state in the 1830s.  The China trade brought silks, teas and porcelains.  Whaling produced candles sold internationally as well as whalebone for ladies’ corsets and ambergris to scent lace hankies.  Martha Dunham was born into a well-to-do family on October 21, 1846.  She had extensive educational opportunities and on March 16, 1874, she married “my old friend Jack.”

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Posted in 2013 By LaDawn Dalton

By Andrew Wallace

Part one of this article (Days Past November 17, 2013) covered Joe Walker’s early years while he was building a national reputation as trapper, explorer and guide.  This part will add the later experiences that led him to this area.

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Posted in 2013 By LaDawn Dalton

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