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by Dr. Richard S. Beal, Jr.

There are very few pastors who have had two cities named after them!  Nevertheless, this is true of one of Prescott’s early pastors at the Lone Star Baptist Church (now First Baptist Church).

The church, in 1900, was located on the west side of South Cortez Street, south of the present Courthouse and post office, the congregation having moved the church in1885 from its location on Fleury Street where the Catholic Church now stands.  In 1898, the tiny Baptist congregation had fewer than forty five members.  The previous pastor, the Reverend G. W. Cram served less than four months.  Who could be induced to become the next pastor?  How does a congregation in a pioneer town get a pastor?

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Posted in 2012 By LaDawn Dalton

Christmas in the wilderness, 1863

Dec 22, 2012 4:11:18 PM

by Mick Woodcock

In 1863, Christmas was new to the list of celebrations for most people in the United States.  Popularized in part by the drawings of Santa Claus and Christmas done by Thomas Nast for Harpers Weeklymagazine, much of the tradition as we know it today was in place by the time of the founding of Prescott.  That particular Christmas was remembered and recorded by a number of people.  No doubt the fact that this was the formation year of the Territory of Arizona had much to do with it.

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Posted in 2012 By LaDawn Dalton

by Judy Stoycheff

The Fitzmaurice Ruin, a multi-room prehistoric stone pueblo sits on a hill overlooking Lynx Creek in what is now Fain Park in Prescott Valley.  Over 900 years ago, this pueblo complex was constructed and inhabited by up to as many as 100 people at any given time beginning around A.D.1100 and continuing for 250 years.  Indiscriminate digging or “pot hunting” has caused considerable physical damage to the site and made it difficult for legitimate scientists to gather valid data.  Avocational and professional archaeologists use the artifacts found at such sites to date the habitation era and piece together what activities took place there. Questions as to the religious practices, food types and gathering methods, hunting and/or farming tools as well as trade items and possible trader identification can often be answered using the artifacts found at a site.

So, what of the people and artifacts from the Fitzmaurice Ruin?

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Posted in 2012 By LaDawn Dalton

by Judy Stoycheff

In 1936, according to a published report, some of the members of the Yavapai County Chamber of Commerce (YCCC) took a tour to one of Prescott Valley’s timeless treasures.  They traveled by automobile eleven miles east of Prescott to Black Canyon Highway and then by mountain road to the Fitzmaurice property on Lynx Creek in Prescott Valley where Fain Park is now located.  On foot, they climbed a hill overlooking the mining operations on Lynx Creek to the prehistoric ruin known as the Fitzmaurice Ruin.

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Posted in 2012 By LaDawn Dalton

by Dr. Richard S. Beal, Jr.

It was 1879 and Romulus Adolphus Windes, just having completed his education at the Baptist Union Theological Seminary in Chicago, was faced with a problem.  His wife, Magdalene Ann, suffered terribly from asthma.  A physician advised a move to the dry climate of Arizona.  The American Baptist Home Mission Society was happy to appoint him to the town of Prescott, the capital of the Territory where gold had been discovered sixteen years before.  Windes felt it was the call of God, but how could he possibly move his wife and their two small children to such a remote place?

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Posted in 2012 By LaDawn Dalton

(Originally written by Richard Gorby & edited and updated by Kathy Krause.  Original article was published in the Prescott Courier on August 30, 1998.)

(Ed note: Many Prescottonians remember well the hill between Lowes and the Gateway Mall on Route 69 as “Bullwhacker Hill.”  Today the name is rarely heard.  A remnant of the old road, with its gentle curve, is still visible on the slope to the north of the present highway, below the Lamb and York car dealerships.  In January of 1988, the hill was “in for a whacking” by the highway department when they began construction to straighten the road and lower the rise of the hill.  Today, the Gateway Mall is at its top, but 137 years ago the Bullwhacker Mine was in that spot.  The mine changed hands many times, was discarded many times and, although called Salvador for a while, still retained the Bullwhacker name.)

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Posted in 2012 By LaDawn Dalton

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