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by Mick Woodcock

In 1863, celebrating Christmas was new for most people in the United States.  It was popularized in part by the first drawings of ‘Santa Claus’ by Thomas Nast for Harpers Weekly magazine in December of 1862.  The following year, many accounts of Christmas celebrations can be found, owing perhaps to the fact that it was the year Arizona was named a Territory.

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Posted in 2011 By LaDawn Dalton

by Parker Anderson

The first legal hanging in Prescott’s history of Manuel Abiles is not remembered as an extraordinary event.  The people involved are not colorful and legendary, though it has been written about a number of times.  (Note: There are three spellings in various documents and accounts of the first Prescott hanging pertaining to his last name.  The oldest documents at the time of the hanging spell his last name Abiles.  Later written accounts use Aviles.  There is even one newspaper article that spells his name Abelis.  To maintain consistency, we will use the name as given in the oldest documents.)

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Posted in 2011 By LaDawn Dalton

by Kathy Krause

The 36-foot replica of the USS Arizona battleship (fondly called ZOE by the builders, Cecil and Pat Gates) was put into “dry dock” at the end of 1991 after 7 years, 6,700 water miles and 8,000 road miles.  Her mission had been to teach the history of our proud Navy and especially to teach children about the sacrifices that were made to give us the freedoms we enjoy.

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Posted in 2011 By LaDawn Dalton

by Kathy Krause

Many of you in Prescott, Arizona had a real treat in mid-September at the ‘Best Fest’ statehood celebration marking the beginning of the state-wide centennial activities when, among many other wonderful sights, you came across the 36-foot replica of the USS Arizona BB-39 parked at the intersection of Goodwin and Montezuma streets.  The beautifully restored replica had been “missing in action” from about 1995 until 2005.  Few seemed to know its whereabouts; most didn’t notice or care.

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Posted in 2011 By LaDawn Dalton

by James F. Vivian

The remarkable attraction is called the ‘Miner Statue,’ crafted during the spring and summer of 1916.  It is on permanent display today at the Capitol Museum in Phoenix.  The citizens’ group that sponsored the well-known sterling silver dining service for the USS Arizona intended the statue as a companion piece in commemoration of the launching of the ship on June 19, 1915.  The custom was, at that time, that a state for which a battleship was named would provide a silver service that would be featured in the officer’s galley.  The statue, in combination with the burnished copper serving tray, punch bowl and twelve goblets attached a decidedly local embellishment to the sixty-six-piece collection.  Nearly all the other sixteen battleships in the Atlantic Fleet had their sterling silver dining sets on board, but no other would have the added attraction of a bronze sculpture.

 

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Posted in 2011 By LaDawn Dalton

by Parker Anderson

One of the most enduring legends in Prescott, handed down through the years by generations of old-timers, is that the famous belly-dancer (or rather, “exotic dancer”) “Little Egypt” appeared live at the Palace bar in 1910.  This story has been repeated often enough that few have ever questioned it.

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Posted in 2011 By LaDawn Dalton

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