Log In

Log In

Forgot Your Password?

Cart Subtotal: $0.00

Items 1 to 6 of 39 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
Set Descending Direction

by Carol Powell

There are many reasons why people immigrated to America from the old country. Ludwig Mueller left Germany because of political oppression, revolution and war. Constitutions were being withdrawn, rights were taken away and many decided to seek refuge in other countries. By 1848, revolutionary movements broke out in many countries of Europe.

Read More
Posted in 2009 By LaDawn Dalton

by Tom Collins

The year 1886 marked a significant turning point in Territorial Prescott’s cultural life. Hon. Levi Bashford built an addition to Howey’s Hall and installed upholstered chairs to make a first-class opera house of the existing theatre on the second floor. And a talented young German immigrant, Prof. Ludwig Thomas, arrived in Prescott in time to make the remodeled theatre ring with the sound of music. Under Thomas’s baton, local singers and musicians flourished as never before, making Prescott the cultural capitol of Arizona.

Read More
Posted in 2009 By LaDawn Dalton

Prescott’s Smoki Bomber, 1944

Dec 12, 2009 1:41:10 PM

by Goodie Berquist, PhD

In the archives at the Smoki Museum in Prescott, there is an unusual document: a copy of a letter addressed to the "Captain and Crew of the Smoki Bomber." It has no date or address given. Did such an airplane actually exist? If so, what role did the City of Prescott play in its creation? Did such an airplane see action in wartime?

Read More
Posted in 2009 By LaDawn Dalton

(This article was written by Sharlot M. Hall, founder of Sharlot Hall Museum, and first appeared in the Prescott Courier on December 24, 1930.)

Sixty-six years ago the snow lay white over the hills; the tops of the high peaks were crystal white and cold; the pine and cedar and juniper trees were sparkling like trees on a Christmas card. Winter begun early in 1864, and by the middle of December the trails were mostly snowed under and lost – all but those often traveled which led to the placer gold mines on Lynx Creek, or to Walnut Grove and the camps on the Hassayampa.

 

Read More
Posted in 2009 By LaDawn Dalton

by Richard Cesario

During the hard times of the depression years, Rosie earned a living as a carpenter and roofer while working for the WPA (Works Progress Administration). It was through the WPA that he got a job instructing in music at Fort Whipple. In 1933-34, he worked with the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) as a tree skinner, climbing trees and cutting out the blight. In 1936, he was employed in the TB ward at Fort Whipple Hospital.

Read More
Posted in 2009 By LaDawn Dalton

By Richard M. Cesario

Prescott’s beloved Leonard "Rosie" Ross died on April 21, 2009 at the age of 103. He was a patriot extraordinaire, a generous philanthropist and was honored and valued by all who knew him. You may have seen him on the TV commercial which aired on CNN, CNBC, Fox News and other networks for Genworth Financial where he mentioned he could be found "every Friday night at the Pine Cone Inn" Supper Club playing his trumpet and dancing. He was 100 years old at the time the commercial was made!

Read More
Posted in 2009 By LaDawn Dalton

Items 1 to 6 of 39 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
Set Descending Direction