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Memories of Old Skull Valley

Dec 6, 2008 9:23:00 AM

By Edna Ballew Patton 

(Edna Mae Ballew Patton lived in Skull Valley for over 60 years. In the late 1990s, she committed many of her memories to paper. Following are her writings. Mrs. Patton died on July 31, 2008, only five days after meeting with Sharlot Hall Museum volunteer, Parker Anderson, and giving permission for her memoirs to be published.)

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Posted in 2008 By LaDawn Dalton

by Jeb Stuart Rosebrook, Ph.D 

(The following article was adapted from an article initially published by the Society for American Baseball Research in "Mining Towns to Major Leagues: A History of Arizona Baseball." It is re-printed by the author's permission.) 

In January 1873, a Prescott paper, the Arizona Miner, reported one of the first games played in the Arizona Territory, a Christmas day match at Camp Grant in southeastern Arizona. "In the afternoon, an exciting game of base ball took place. This occupied the attention, [of] both of the combatants, until one o'clock, when the welcome call to dinner was wafted to our ears, and readily responded to." No score or outcome of the game was reported. With the first professional league organized in the East in 1871, and baseball being played in the far corners of the Western Territories, the game of baseball was on its way to becoming ingrained in America's consciousness - and Arizona's - as the national pastime.

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Posted in 2008 By LaDawn Dalton

Squatting on the plaza: 1867 style

Oct 1, 2008 9:30:09 AM

by Ken Edwards

A squatter is an individual who settles on property belonging to someone else or to the government. After a certain period of occupancy he may claim the property as his own. In so doing, he is claiming squatters’ rights or the right of adverse possession. The legal requirements for claiming a tract of land in this manner vary from state to state, but the laws are, in general, still on the books. In the early days of the United States and, in fact, in colonial days, squatting was very common. Most of the land in the young nation had not been surveyed, and squatting was a common way of acquiring property. Squatting was later largely supplanted by homesteading throughout the country.

 

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Posted in 2008 By LaDawn Dalton

by T. Stone 

(In Part I, we learned that the 1918 Spanish flu arrived in Prescott on October 2, 1918 and the spread of infection rose and fell like a scythe cutting ripe wheat.) 

By October 8th, Prescott was shut down but not yet officially quarantined. The newspaper warned that there should be "no public gatherings of any sort." In Jerome, approximately 20 cases of influenza were reported. In the predominately Mormon town of Snowflake, the only physician, Dr. Caldwell, became an early influenza fatality, causing the community of 900 people to put out a call for another doctor.

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Posted in 2008 By LaDawn Dalton

by T. Stone 

Ninety years ago, the world, in the final throes of the Great War (known today as World War I), was confronted with an influenza pandemic that ended up killing more than 50,000,000 people worldwide; a number at least twice the number of those soldiers who died in battle during the war. Some called it the "plague" but most called this contagion the Spanish flu because it was first reported as a pandemic in Spain.

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Posted in 2008 By LaDawn Dalton

by Parker Anderson 

It was June 6, 1898. The dust had not yet settled from the hanging three days earlier of legendary Yavapai County outlaw James Parker, when the still of everyday Prescott life was shattered by the sound of gunfire on North Cortez Street. Soon, Dr. John Bryan McNally, one of Prescott's most prominent physicians (and remembered yet today as a great Prescott pioneer) staggered out into the street with a gunshot wound. It was nothing short of a miracle that McNally was alive, for, as the Arizona Journal-Miner reported: "The bullet struck a watch in Dr. McNally's pocket, glancing off and then passed through the fleshy part of the left arm between the elbow and wrist."

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Posted in 2008 By LaDawn Dalton

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