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by Michael King 

(Last weeks article outlined the evolution of the land use policies, laws and public sentiment, which provided the foundation for the national forest establishment. Today's article features the local context, including the early history of the City of Prescott's water supply challenges and the relationship to the Prescott Forest Reserve designation.)

Prescott was founded in 1864 as the Arizona territorial capital. The Village Council of Prescott was established in 1873. At the time it was called the Common Council. Prescott was later incorporated in 1883. Minutes of council meetings, newspaper articles and the research notes of Dr. C.A. Yount, former City of Prescott Health Officer, offer glimpses into the early challenges of meeting the goal of providing a never-ending supply of pure drinking water. Numerous water bond initiatives and resulting water structures and facilities were largely responsible for the heavy indebtedness of Prescott during its first 50 to 60 years of existence.

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Posted in 2007 By LaDawn Dalton

by Tom Collins 

Still at the helm, Dauphin produced Arthur Sullivan's one-act operetta "Cox and Box; or, The Long-Lost Brothers," (based on John Maddison Morton's famous farce "Box and Cox") in January 1886. Sergeant Bouncer, a landlord (Harry Carpenter), has a scheme to get double rent from a single room. By day he lets it to Mr. Box (a printer who is out all night, played by J.E. Brown) and by night to Mr. Cox (a hatter who works all day, played by Joe Dauphin). When the lodgers raise awkward questions, Bouncer distracts them by singing of his military exploits.

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Posted in 2007 By LaDawn Dalton

by Sharlot M. Hall 

(Edited by Parker Anderson) 

(The following is reprinted from the Prescott Journal Miner of November 13, 1919. That newspaper had captured a Gila monster and had it on display in their office, which, for some reason, prompted a debate lasting several days over whether or not Gila monsters were poisonous.)

As I looked at the captive Gila monster in the Journal-Miner office, I wondered if anyone beside myself had kept a Gila monster as a pet over a long enough period of time to become really friends with the curious big lizard. 

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Posted in 2007 By LaDawn Dalton

by Michael King 

Prescott's early water supply issues are closely tied to the evolution of public land policies and the designation of the Prescott Forest Reserve. Following the Revolutionary War, lands between the Appalachian Mountains and the Mississippi River came under federal ownership. Due to the large military debt and financial needs of a fledgling nation these lands were viewed as important sources of revenue. Tariffs, taxes and land sales were major sources of income for our new nation. 

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Posted in 2007 By LaDawn Dalton

by Richard Gorby 

Prescott in 1891 was twenty-four years old and the County Seat of Yavapai County. It boasted a population of nearly 3,000 people according to Jules Baumann, Prescott's bandmaster, photographer, and artist, on his 1891 lithograph of the city. 

Prescott is located in a "level basin of Granite Creek, 5,600 feet above sea level and is a place of much business importance, being the center of a very extensive mining, cattle and agricultural region. The military post known as Whipple Barracks is located one mile below the town. Prescott enjoys a most perfect climate; cyclones, fog, extreme heat or cold are unknown here. The air is light, dry and pure, full of fragrance from the lofty pines which cover the surrounding hills," Baumann reported. Prescott also had a beautiful town square, the "biggest west of the Mississippi," with a charming Courthouse, surrounded by trees planted by the towns famous Buckey O'Neill. And around that square Prescott had all that was needed by the shopper, lodger, saloon-goers, etc.

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Posted in 2007 By LaDawn Dalton

by Fred Veil 

The Pleasant Valley, situated in the Tonto Basin in an area surrounding present-day Young, Arizona, was in the 1880s a bucolic land consisting of plentiful grass, clear mountain streams and sunny days. It was perfect for raising cattle, as well as the nemesis of the cattleman - sheep. It was also the site of one of the most infamous events of Arizona history - the Pleasant Valley War, or as it is often known, the Graham-Tewksbury Feud. 

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Posted in 2007 By LaDawn Dalton

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