Log In

Log In

Forgot Your Password?

Cart Subtotal: $0.00

Items 1 to 6 of 40 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
Set Descending Direction

In November of 2000 Parker Anderson, a local Prescott historian, wrote an article for Days Past about a notorious citizen and outlaw of old Prescott by the name of Louis C. Miller. He ended the article by stating: 

"The trail of Louis C. Miller stops there. I have no further information about the rest of his life, or when and where he died. Unlike today's media-saturated cases, notorious citizens in those days were often able to drift back into anonymity if they so desired. Louis C. Miller may be buried somewhere under his own name, but so far records have not been located. If anyone reading this has further data on Louis C. Miller, please contact either myself, or the Sharlot Hall Museum Archives."

Read More
Posted in 2006 By LaDawn Dalton

As told by Mrs. Lillybelle Morshead to Arthur Ensign and H.G. Grey of the Federal Writer's Project 

(Beginning with this week's Days Past article, we will begin to unearth the stories of Yavapai County as told to the Federal Writer's Project. The FWP was created by the Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression of the 1930s to create income to writers, educators, and historians dedicated to documenting 'American Life.' The project published guidebooks, organized archives, indexed newspapers, and collected folklore and oral history interviews. The following story is of John G. Campbell, the proprietor of the first store in Prescott, as told by his daughter, Lillybelle Morshead to the FWP writers. The manuscript, located in the Archives of Sharlot Hall Museum, is from the John G. Campbell Collection of photographs, essays, and biographical information on this important pioneer.)

When Governor Goodwin proclaimed Arizona a Territory of The United States and established its capital at Prescott, my father opened a store there, which gave the newly made capital a total of two well-made buildings. The other was the Governor's Mansion. 

Read More
Posted in 2006 By LaDawn Dalton

How Skull Valley Got its Name

Dec 23, 2006 11:02:38 AM

by A.E. Ensign, Yavapai County 

J.H. Ehle, rewrite, Federal Writers Project c. 1935 

The following account continues our series of stories written by the Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration of depression era Arizona. The story was based on an oral history interview of Skull Valley 'old timer' Joe Farrell (as is noted later in the text) as told to the FWP workers.

Read More
Posted in 2006 By LaDawn Dalton

Christmas Celebration - 1903

Dec 23, 2006 11:00:11 AM

Skull Valley, Kirkland area knew how to throw a party 

Article submitted by Nancy Burgess 

(This article first appeared in the Prescott Herald in 1903 and was later reprinted in the December 23, 1949 Prescott Evening Courier.) 

Christmas was celebrated by the people of Skull Valley and the Kirkland section Friday night by a big ball given in the school house two miles below the eating house at Skull Valley. People were there from all over that section and the affair was one of the most pleasant we have ever attended. Our readers have doubtless heard of "hog-killing times;" well, that was one, if there ever was one.

Read More
Posted in 2006 By LaDawn Dalton

by Ann Hibner Koblitz 

When people think of mining, typically they conjure up images of the large enterprises of Virginia City in Nevada or Jerome and Globe in Arizona where prospectors and miners could become rich almost overnight, and millions of tons of high grade ores were extracted and processed during the course of decades-long operations.

Read More
Posted in 2006 By LaDawn Dalton

by Tom Collins 

On the southeast corner of Cortez and Goodwin streets, the current site of the City of Prescott building, there once stood Howey's Hall, the cultural center of Prescott. 

For some fifteen years, citizens gathered there for theatrical performances, orchestral concerts, socials and balls, lectures, magic shows, skating parties, graduation exercises, and even church services. Built in 1876 by E. I. Roberts for local blacksmith James Howey, it originally housed the Goldwater & Brothers Mercantile business on the first floor, and soon the Masonic Lodge on the second floor. It was one of the first brick buildings in town, a classically designed structure, 60 feet long and 33 feet wide, each story rising 14 feet between the joists.

Read More
Posted in 2006 By LaDawn Dalton

Items 1 to 6 of 40 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
Set Descending Direction