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by Shirley Turner Summers 

(Part I of a two part article.) 

The Dunbar Weekly noted Governor W.P. Hunt, Arizona's first governor, who won election for seven terms, as "one who neither looks up to the rich nor down on the poor, who can lose without squealing and win without bragging, who is considerate of women and children and old people, who is too sensible to loaf, who takes his share of the world's goods and lets others have theirs, is, indeed, a true gentleman!"

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Posted in 2005 By LaDawn Dalton

by Shirley Turner Summers 

(Last week, former Governor Hunt persuaded the commanding officer to grant the author's father 48 hours of leave from Camp Funston to see his mother, Mary Elizabeth Turner Calder, who had met and traveled to the Kansas camp on the same train with the former Governor.) 

She was indebted to the governor for this favor, so wrote the poem, "A Rippling Rhyme," about meeting him on the train, and when she got to Virginia, sent it to him in Phoenix with a letter of gratitude.

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Posted in 2005 By LaDawn Dalton

by Anita Zeller 

Memories are a big part of the Christmas season. They link the past with the present, preserving tradition in the heart as well as the mind. While memories may not always record history with pinpoint accuracy, they can offer an overall view of a time now gone, and give warm insight into the nature of the person who is recalling and translating the past.

In doing the research for this article, I found some memories that I felt needed to be shared. The language and the imagery of those recollections seemed to me both graceful and vivid. They captured early Prescott at Christmastime in a way I could never hope to do. 

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Posted in 2005 By LaDawn Dalton

by Al Bates 

Usually when we think of Christmastime in Territorial Prescott we have images of jolly families with little children warm and snugly gathered around a candle-lit tree after enjoying the fruits of their mama's kitchen efforts. But there was an earlier time when Prescott was barely a town and was peopled by a predominance of single men-especially when the miners came to town.

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Posted in 2005 By LaDawn Dalton

by Dr. Ted Finkelston 

(Our tale from last week left off as Jacob Theobald, a Prescott youth drafted into the military to fight in the Great War, was finishing his training in the South of France, ready to take his orders to move to the front line.) 

Without really telling his mother his unit had moved to the front, Jake wrote in early August, "Bob's big change is in spirits his like the rest of us getting a bit hard at times, but this life in the trenches will make anyone feel that way at times. We are not dry for a week eat & sleep in mud two feet deep but the Hun will pay for it and before very long." On the back of this letter, he noted, "You should have my ins. policy by this time, but I'll give you my number so if it don't reach you you will be able to collect without it, by the way I feel now it will be in about 100 years."

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Posted in 2005 By LaDawn Dalton

By Dr. Ted Finkelston 

On the morning of April 27, 1918, the Selective Service Board of Yavapai County met in the county courthouse and chose 47 young men to be drafted into the United States Army. The 'Draft' had been enacted by Congress and signed by President Wilson a year earlier to choose men 'upon the principle of universal liability to service.'

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Posted in 2005 By LaDawn Dalton

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