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by Ken Edwards 

Rancher, entrepreneur, truck driver, farmer, and builder. All of these terms apply to John Benton 'Jack' Jones, builder of Prescott's historic Hotel Vendome. Often confused with a miner of the same name, the "real" (for our purposes) Jack Jones was never involved in mining activity. Born in a small ranching community in central Texas in 1881, Jack left home at an early age because he couldn't get along with the rest of his family.

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Posted in 2004 By LaDawn Dalton

The first Masonic burial in Arizona

Aug 14, 2004 1:38:44 PM

by Evelyn B. Baldwin, edited by Parker Anderson 

(This article first appeared in the Prescott Evening Courier on October 27, 1936. It was submitted to the paper by the Courier's Jerome correspondent, Madge Whitford. It was written by her father's cousin, Arctic explorer, Mr. Evelyn Baldwin. The article has been long forgotten, and is presented here, re-discovered at last. P.A.) 

The following true narrative of the first Masonic burial in Arizona, as related to me by my old friend, Col. W.M. Williams, of Cairo, Ill., will doubtless interest your readers. I give it, as nearly as possible, in his own words:

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Posted in 2004 By LaDawn Dalton

Kellis Ranch, Bagdad. Arizona Part 2 

by Linda Ludington 

In Part 1, we learned that Ed Kellis dreamed of owning a cattle ranch, and that as a toddler, he received his first heifer calf. During the Depression, the Kellis family sold their Blackwell, Texas windmill business and blacksmith shop, and moved to Arizona. Having purchased a herd of goats and cattle in Bagdad, the family met witih financial disaster due to a severe winter, during which most of the livestock perished. Ed Kellis started work at the mine in Bagdad. In 1961, he finally purchased the ranch of which he had dreamed.

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Posted in 2004 By LaDawn Dalton

The Prescott Chautauqua Reading Circle

Jul 24, 2004 1:40:45 PM

by Anne Foster 

Modern Prescottonians embrace the image of the town as a Wild West icon, complete with a notorious street of saloons and a tumultuous history. For some residents in the late 19th century, however, the goal was to promote a civilized, well-to-do persona in keeping with the prosperity and optimism of the age. In keeping with this ideal, the town's leading ladies formed the Prescott Chautauqua Reading Circle. 

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Posted in 2004 By LaDawn Dalton

Granite Mountain Gold

Jul 17, 2004 1:41:55 PM

by Goodwin Berquist 

In 1863 when gold was first discovered in the Prescott area, all a miner needed was a pick axe, a strong back, determination, and a little bit of luck. Up to October 1, 1876, of 11, 605 mines located and recorded in the Arizona Territory, 7,298 were in the county of Yavapai. Area mines yielded silver, copper, iron, and lead, as well as gold. Rich deposits of gold nuggets were discovered and mined in these early years.

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Posted in 2004 By LaDawn Dalton

Cattle drive

Jul 10, 2004 1:42:59 PM

by Bill Peck 

From the 1900's until about 1960, livestock shipping corrals stood beside the railroad tracks at most small towns in Arizona. Made of creosoted timbers and plank fences, one could get a good look at all of the local cowboy gentry at shipping time They sat on the top board of the fence which was laid flat for walking purposes.

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Posted in 2004 By LaDawn Dalton

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