Log In

Log In

Forgot Your Password?

Cart Subtotal: $0.00

Items 1 to 6 of 52 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
Set Descending Direction

By Terry Munderloh 

The USS ARIZONA was launched from the Brooklyn Navy Yard in New York on June 19, 1915. She would be the third ship to bear that name. 

The first ARIZONA was an iron side-wheel steamer purchased by the Government in 1863 and used in service during the Civil War. The second ARIZONA was a first class screw frigate launched in 1865 at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.

Read More
Posted in 2003 By LaDawn Dalton

By Nancy Kirkpatrick Wright 

Have you been to Chloride recently? If you are one of those folks who are drawn to unusual back-road adventures, you will find the road to Chloride by taking highway 93 north from Kingman about 15 miles. From there, the side road winds its way up the mountain three or four miles to a cluster of nineteenth century mining communities.

Read More
Posted in 2003 By LaDawn Dalton

By Mick Woodcock 

Occasionally, one of the old newspaper articles is too good not to reprint. Just days before Christmas on December 22, 1876 the Arizona Weekly Miner published one of those. It describes the new brick building built for the local mercantile firm of C. P. Head & Co.. This store was located on the northeast corner of Gurley and Montezuma streets and stood there until destroyed by the fire of 1900, which burned much of Prescott's business district.

"A Splendid Establishment. 

Read More
Posted in 2003 By LaDawn Dalton

By Carol Powell 

In the early 1880s, the wagon trains provided the means for a whole family to move in exchange for the labor of the head of the house. The Louis and Clara Miller family were just such a family. Clara had been married before and had children already. In the course of her marriage to Louis, she produced eight more children. Four of the boys grew up to become railroad men. The oldest of the six boys, Louis Clair Miller, who eventually served as a constable in Prescott for a while, is the focus of this story.

Read More
Posted in 2003 By LaDawn Dalton

By Pat Conner 

(Much of this article first appeared in the Courier as part of Lester Ward "Budge" Ruffner's column on December 4, 1988.) 

Back when Budge Ruffner was a boy, county work crews and a huge, freshly cut spruce from the Bradshaw Mountains could only mean one thing. It was time to erect the Christmas tree on the Prescott town square. 

Read More
Posted in 2003 By LaDawn Dalton

By Ann Hibner Koblitz 

In the 19th century several kinds of practitioners claimed to be able to address the health needs of Americans. In addition to college- or university-trained physicians, there were midwives, pharmacists, surgeon-barbers (the red and white stripes of the traditional barber's pole originally symbolized surgery), itinerate medicine peddlers (the so-called "snake oil salesmen" who later fell into disrepute), and in some areas Native American shamans and the Anglos who claimed to have studied with them.

Read More
Posted in 2003 By LaDawn Dalton

Items 1 to 6 of 52 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
Set Descending Direction