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By Ken Edwards 

(This is the first of a two-part history of early automobiles in Yavapai County) 

The Main Circus came to Prescott in November of 1899, arriving by train. Among the attractions was a new-fangled contraption from the east called an automobile. This particular vehicle was powered by an electric storage battery and, the Weekly Journal-Miner reported, "runs perfectly noiseless."

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Posted in 2002 By LaDawn Dalton

by Bill Lynam 

(This is the second of a two-part series.) 

Tom Mix and his Ralston Straight Shooters radio program ran from 1933 until 1950, and is probably the best-remembered part of Mixiana by people today. Over the career of the radio shows, by contract, Tom Mix never appeared in any of them. This created an opportunity for different radio personalities to be the on-air Tom Mix.

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Posted in 2002 By LaDawn Dalton

By Bill Lynam 

(This is part one of a two-part series) 

The hoof beats on the radio have gone silent and his western movies are no longer in vogue, but Tom Mix rides on, if only in the memories of his many fans who grew up on his films, radio shows and personal appearances. I asked my brother what he remembered about Tom Mix and he hit me with a portion of an advertising jingle that stuck in his head from the "Tom Mix Ralston Straight Shooters" radio program: "Take a tip from Tom, Go tell your Mom, Hot Ralston can't be beat."

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Posted in 2002 By LaDawn Dalton

By Ben Allen 

In the year 2000 during the reunion of the Prescott High School class of 1945, the attendees were invited on a tour of the new high school in north Prescott. Mr. Tim Carter, the principal, conducted us on a tour of this fine facility. I remember best the gymnasium because one of the first things we encountered when we entered the main door was a large wall, which bore the sign, Our Wall of Fame. And, very prominent on it was a large picture of our 1944 varsity football team.

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Posted in 2002 By LaDawn Dalton

by Parker Anderson 

It may seem difficult to believe in this day and age, but there was a time when dancing-any form of dancing-was considered an immoral practice and a sin against God. This idea might bring laughter to most people in the present, but it was taken seriously throughout the 19th century. Dancing would become a popular pastime for Americans in the early 20th century, but pockets of anti-dancing sentiment still existed. Dancing had men and women who were not always married actually TOUCHING each other (always considered immoral in those days), and often moving one's body into contorted positions (though nothing like today, of course), which was also considered obscene.

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Posted in 2002 By LaDawn Dalton

by John Paulsen 

(Seventy-five years ago this coming June 11, the first guest signed the Governor's Mansion register and the Sharlot Hall Museum began. We are running a series of articles over the coming months that will explore the people and events that have shaped the museum's long journey. This Sunday, and next, we will explore what life was like in Prescott in 1928.)

In 1928, a year predicted by Washington to be "a banner year", two newspapers served Prescott's 5,517 citizens. Both the Prescott Journal-Miner and the Prescott Evening Courier were heavy on local news. The Courier, however, was usually more staid and formal, while the Miner leaned towards sensationalism, sporting big black headlines and multiple font changes. The Courier regularly printed "News of Interest from Whipple" (a U.S. Veterans Bureau Hospital) with listings of admissions, releases, and deaths. Not to be outdone, the Miner carried the 'Prescott Social Scene', with such tidbits as bridge parties, dances, and current gossip. Both papers daily listed the names and addresses of every hotel guest. 

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Posted in 2002 By LaDawn Dalton

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