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By Ken Edwards 

For more than a decade after Arizona achieved territorial status, there were no banks closer than Santa Fe, New Mexico and the major cities of California. Gold and silver were the accepted currency; paper money was not always trusted. 

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Posted in 1998 By LaDawn Dalton

Christmas Celebration - 1903

Dec 12, 1998 11:16:59 AM

Article submitted by Nancy Burgess 

(This article first appeared in the Prescott Herald in 1903 and was later reprinted in the December 23, 1949 Prescott Evening Courier.) 

Christmas was celebrated by the people of Skull Valley and the Kirkland section Friday night by a big ball given in the school house two miles below the eating house at Skull Valley. People were there from all over that section and the affair was one of the most pleasant we have ever attended. Our readers have doubtless heard of "hog-killing times;" well, that was one, if there ever was one.

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Posted in 1998 By LaDawn Dalton

Rough and Polished Prescott in 1871

Dec 5, 1998 11:18:01 AM

By Mick Woodcock 

Ever wonder what Prescott was like in its early days, back before photographs were taken? Many of us have, I'm sure, that is why it is a rare treat to discover a published account that opens the window to early days and times. 

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Posted in 1998 By LaDawn Dalton

We thought we had landed in heaven

Nov 21, 1998 11:18:55 AM

(Published as a three-part series on November 22, November 29 and December 6, 1998) 

by Ted Edmundson 

Part I 

My first exposure to Arizona was in October, 1929. My mother had ten kids (five girls and five boys), was quite frail, and about ready to go into TB. Her doctor suggested that we take her to the Arizona desert. Incidentally, she lived to be eighty -nine and dad died at the age of fifty-nine. We should have come out here for dads health.

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Posted in 1998 By LaDawn Dalton

Harry Brisley, early Prescott booster

Nov 14, 1998 11:20:47 AM

By William Bork 

Harry Brisley, a native of London, England, came to Prescott and set up his drugstore on Whiskey Row in 1893. He remained in business until the sale of the store to W.S. Bontag in 1925. From early on, he was a big booster of the climate, scenic beauties of the area, and of other attractions. A native of London, where he had completed a rigorous apprenticeship, he was joined by a cousin, T. Ed Litt, a Canadian, born in Stratford, Ontario, who soon chose to move to Tucson, where he was in business at the corner of Congress and Stone in the downtown until 1949. It appears that Brisley came to Arizona by way of Canada and many people thought both men were Canadians. A true Canadian, E.A. Kastner, a grocer, who introduced the Piggly?Wiggly Supermarket to Prescott, came here at about the same time.

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Posted in 1998 By LaDawn Dalton

By Dawn Dollard 

The ultimatum was implied. "If you go to Tonto!" George Brown had almost said to Angeline Brigham Mitchell. But Angie, writing in her diary on September 5, 1880, reacted to the unspoken threat: "I merely reminded him that I promised I'd go to the most 'barbarous' country I could if he ran for anything on the ticket and he promised not to. He broke his share of the agreement [George had run for and been elected as a Republican representative to the 11th Territorial Legislature to meet in Prescott in January 1881] and I thought Tonto would answer my purpose.

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Posted in 1998 By LaDawn Dalton

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