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by Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribe

In the 1870s the Army was still hunting Geronimo.  He was known as Goyathlay by his tribe (Bedonkohe Mescalero-Chiricahua) and Gajeesah by the Yavapai (for the name of the place his mother, wife, and three children were massacred by Mexicans).  According to Geronimo's biography he was made war chief of all the Apaches with this name (his spelling: Kas-ki-yeh). 

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Posted in 2017 By Tom Schmidt

By Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribe

This is Part One of an article on Yavapai Indian scouts who served with the U. S. Army in the late 1800s.  [Note:  Last year there was a Days Past article on Apache Scouts who won the Medal of Honor.  That article misidentified Sergeant Rowdy, a heroic Yavapai Scout, and did not cover the exploits of other Yavapai Scouts.  This article picks up the story of the Yavapai.]

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Posted in 2017 By Tom Schmidt

Cowboy Poetry

Apr 19, 2017 10:35:15 AM

by Sally Bates

“Cowboy” poetry is as old as the trail driving days following the Civil War when young men working horseback in the great American West brought with them elements of the British ballad tradition. Using the form of poetry they had learned to recite in school, kitchen, or parlor they recorded events and passed on traditions. Favorite songs and stories about experiences on the cattle drives or ranches became their unique way of sharing experiences — past and present. It was not strange to hear many different versions of old ballads revised to hold new personal experiences. Nor would it be unusual for them to write lines to old songs and spirituals using the rhyme and meter presented therein. 

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Posted in 2017 By Tom Schmidt

Harvey Girls in Northern Arizona

Apr 12, 2017 9:19:27 AM

By Mary Melcher

Harvey Girls were hard-working waitresses who served meals at the Fred Harvey Hotels and restaurants along the Santa Fe Railroad. These young women waited tables in several Arizona hotels, including the Escalante in Ash Fork, La Posada in Winslow, El Tovar at the Grand Canyon and the Havasu in Seligman. Hired for their ability to provide excellent service and for their moral character, they brought increased respect to the position of waitressing while also aiding in the development of tourism in the Southwest.

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Posted in 2017 By Tom Schmidt

Arizona and the Great War

Apr 5, 2017 9:05:47 AM

By Mick Woodcock

The year 2017 commemorates the 100th anniversary of the United States’ involvement in what is known as World War I.  Arizona had only been a state for five years when the European conflict became more than headlines in the newspaper.  It touched the lives of everyone residing in the state, whether a citizen or a sojourner.  For the first time since it was created as a separate territory in 1863, Arizona was about to take full part in a very national experience.

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Posted in 2017 By Tom Schmidt

By Al Bates

On the evening of March 13, 1997, widely scattered reports came in from across Arizona—including Prescott, Prescott Valley and Dewey-Humboldt—of mysterious lights crossing the sky.  This phenomenon, now popularly called “The Phoenix Lights,” is still a topic of controversy.

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Posted in 2017 By Tom Schmidt

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